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VII.6.7 Pompeii. House.

Excavated 1762, 1841 and 1910. Bombed in 1943.

 

According to Garcia y Garcia Region VII, Insula VI was one of the insulae most devastated over the years since its excavation.

He calls it the “Cinderella” of Pompeii. Between the years 1759 and 1762 it was vandalised and stripped by the Bourbons, then re-interred.

Then came the slow and non-systematic uncovering again before the final destruction in September 1943.

The area was ignored and abandoned during the years following the war, which reduced the insula to a heap of bricks and masonry.

See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p.102).

 

According to Fiorelli –

Following are two brick pillars, which line the doorway of a house, in which we can see residues of very ancient constructions, and of which was discovered the tuscanic atrium, having to the left a cubiculum and an ala, on the right the porter’s room underneath of a wooden stairway, followed by a cupboard/storeroom and by another ala, perhaps in here was the domestic lararium. Opposite is the tablinum, which has a cubiculum on the right, and on the other side an oecus, both in communication with areas not yet excavated.

(Seguono due pilastri laterizii, che costeggiano la porta di una casa, in cui notansi residui di costruzioni molto antiche, e della quale e scoperto l’atrio tuscanico, avente a sinistra un cubicolo ed un’ala, a destra la cella dell’ostiario sottoposta ad una gradinata di legno, seguita da un’apotheca e da un’altra ala, nella quale era forse il sacrario domestico. Di fronte sta il tablino, che a destra ha un cubicolo, ed all’altro canto un oecus, entrambi in communicazione con localita non ancora scoverte.)

See Pappalardo, U., 2001. La Descrizione di Pompei per Giuseppe Fiorelli (1875). Napoli: Massa Editore. (p.159)

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. 1910 plan by Spano.
See Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, 1910, fig. 1, p. 437.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. 1910 plan by Spano.

See Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, 1910, fig. 1, p. 437.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. Plan based on PPM.
See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VII. Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 176.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. Plan based on PPM.

See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VII. Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 176.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. September 2019. 
Looking south-east from Via delle Terme towards entrance doorway, between brick pilaster, centre left.
In the centre and right of the photo, would be the areas of VII.6.6, VII.6.5 and VII.6.4.
Photo courtesy of Klaus Heese.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. September 2019. Looking south-east from Via delle Terme towards entrance doorway, between brick pilaster, centre left.

In the centre and right of the photo, would be the areas of VII.6.6, VII.6.5 and VII.6.4. Photo courtesy of Klaus Heese.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. September 2021.  
Looking south through entrance doorway. Photo courtesy of Klaus Heese.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. September 2021. 

Looking south through entrance doorway. Photo courtesy of Klaus Heese.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. October 2020. Looking south through entrance doorway.
Photo courtesy of Klaus Heese.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. October 2020.

Looking south through entrance doorway. Photo courtesy of Klaus Heese.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. December 2004. Looking south across site of atrium and remains of tablinum. This area was hit by a bomb in September 1943.
According to Garcia y Garcia, the prothyron, the atrium, four rooms around the atrium, the south and west sides of the peristyle, and two cubicula to the west  of the peristyle were all destroyed, with the total loss of all their 4th style decoration, including two small painting of landscapes.
See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p.102 & fig 233 showing area demolished by bombing).

VII.6.7 Pompeii. December 2004. Looking south-east across site of atrium and remains of tablinum.

This area was hit by a bomb in September 1943.

According to Garcia y Garcia, the prothyron, the atrium, four rooms around the atrium, the south and west sides of the peristyle, and two cubicula to the west of the peristyle were all destroyed, with the total loss of all their 4th style decoration, including two small painting of landscapes.

See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p.102 & fig 233 showing area demolished by bombing).

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. September 2015. Looking south-east across site of atrium and remains of tablinum, in the upper right.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. September 2015. Looking south-east across site of atrium and remains of tablinum, in the upper right.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. September 2015. Looking south across site of atrium from entrance doorway.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. September 2015. Looking south across site of atrium from entrance doorway.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. September 2015. 
Looking south from site of shop at VII.6.6, across atrium and rooms on either side of VII.6.7.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. September 2015. Looking south from site of shop at VII.6.6, across atrium and rooms on either side of VII.6.7.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. May 2005. Looking south from site of shop at VII.6.6, into atrium of VII.6.7.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. May 2005. Looking south from site of shop at VII.6.6, into atrium of VII.6.7.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. September 2015. Looking south-west across site of atrium.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. September 2015. Looking south-west across site of atrium from entrance doorway.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. September 2021. 
Looking south-west towards tablinum, from west side of shop doorway at VII.6.8. Photo courtesy of Klaus Heese.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. September 2021.

Looking south-west towards tablinum, from west side of shop doorway at VII.6.8.

Photo courtesy of Klaus Heese.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. May 2011. Looking south-west across site of atrium. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. May 2011.

Looking south-west across site of atrium, from around the area of room 40, lower left. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. c.1930. 
Cubiculum 40, flooring of white mosaic, with a hexagon in the centre formed by three diamonds of coloured marble, with border of black, white and red bands. 
DAIR 41.736. Photo © Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Abteilung Rom, Arkiv.
See Pernice, E.  1938. Pavimente und Figürliche Mosaiken: Die Hellenistische Kunst in Pompeji, Band VI. Berlin: de Gruyter, (p.89-90, and taf. 41,2 above).

VII.6.7 Pompeii. c.1930.

Cubiculum 40, flooring of white mosaic, with a hexagon in the centre formed by three diamonds of coloured marble, with border of black, white and red bands.

DAIR 41.736. Photo © Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Abteilung Rom, Arkiv.

See Pernice, E.  1938. Pavimente und Figürliche Mosaiken: Die Hellenistische Kunst in Pompeji, Band VI. Berlin: de Gruyter, (p.89-90, and taf. 41,2 above).

 

According to Notizie degli Scavi, 1910, p.454-461, - (Note: this can be read in italian, at the end of the photos).

Doorway VII was the entrance to a house. The doorposts/jambs were made with pieces of tiles; there is a lava threshold between them, followed by a small vestibule, after which is the threshold of the door, also of lava. The house consists of three main parts, of atrium, of tablinum and of peristyle; the first two parts exactly on the axis between them, the third slightly shifted to the east. It was built in ancient time, as is apparent from the blocks of Sarno stone used in the construction, and by the doorways, tall and tapered; however it was later remodelled in various parts.

 

Fauces 38 had cocciopesto flooring, somewhat inclined towards the street, and the walls retained small remains of plaster, but were worn out in the surface. The corners towards the atrium were lined with wood. (As is observed also in other houses, see Notizie 1910, Fasc. 8, page 316.)

 

The Atrium 39 was tuscanic. It also had flooring of cocciopesto with wide band of Opus Segmentatum around the impluvium which was almost square in shape, with the base formed from the same Opus Segmentatum.

 

Around the atrium several rooms opened, mostly with limestone jambs, and which, although preserved only at the bottom, show from their general effect to have been high and tapered.

 

The first doorway on the left introduced you to room 40; it had a threshold of travertine with holes for the interlocking of the wooden jambs, for the hinges and a last one for the door bolt (pessulus). The room had painted walls,  decoration of which only the red zoccolo remained, divided into squaring by white dashes/hyphens; flooring of white mosaic with double black band around and with a hexagon in the centre formed by three diamonds of coloured marble, with border with black, white and red bands.

 

In the northern wall was a small bricked up doorway, which would have given into the rear of the shop of VIII (VII.6.8), so that in a more ancient time it was in direct communication with this House, as it also proves a high bricked doorway existed in the northern wall of the atrium to the right of the fauces. Opposite to the described room, room 41, at the extreme right of the western side, was a small room with scarce remains of plaster, which, at least today, is shown unadorned, and with the western wall strongly inclined forward.

 

Following, was room 42, a storeroom/cupboard with tapered doorway, which was exactly opposite and facing to the doorway to room 40.

 

On both sides, at the rear, were the alae 43 and 44.

The first (43 on the east side) had corroded plaster on the walls, a very coarse floor, consisting of pieces of marble encrusted in the soil and carried a trace of wooden jambs to the left of the entrance, with marble bearing fitted with the hole for the interlocking of that.

 

The facing west ala, 44, had the same flooring, remains on the walls of large red rectangles, marble bearing on the right of the doorway, which supported the wooden jamb. Leaning against the facing wall (western), were two high masonry steps, perhaps leftovers from a sacrarium.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. May 2011. Looking south towards site of remains of rooms on the west side of the tablinum and atrium.
This area could be approximately the site of the right ala.
According to Boyce, in the right ala of the atrium stood a large masonry podium, which Fiorelli thought may have been the base of a Lararium.
See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14.  (p.67. no.288).

VII.6.7 Pompeii. May 2011. Looking south towards site of remains of rooms on the west side of the tablinum and atrium.

This area could be approximately the site of the right ala.

According to Boyce, in the right ala of the atrium stood a large masonry podium, which Fiorelli thought may have been the base of a Lararium.

See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14.  (p.67. no.288).

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. May 2011. Looking south across site of atrium, through tablinum, to site of peristyle. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. May 2011.

Looking south across site of atrium, through tablinum, to site of peristyle. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

According to Della Corte, and inedited, was the following black inscription written on the neck of a one-handled jug, found on 8th August 1910 -

 

According to Della Corte, and inedited, was the following black inscription written on the neck of a one-handled jug, found on 8th August 1910 -
See Notizie degli Scavi, 1914, (p.112).

See Notizie degli Scavi, 1914, (p.112).

 

Notizie degli Scavi, 1910, p.454-461

The tablinum, 45, was vast, it had flooring of signinum, exhibiting parallel rows of white tesserae placed at equal intervals, a meandric line at the place of the threshold on the side of the atrium, and a square in the middle with a circle within decorated in turn with lines forming diamonds. The walls retain scarce remains of corroded plaster. The pillars at the entrance had wooden jambs, of which the marble bearings were conserved.

 

On either side of the tablinum were two rooms, 46 and 47, both with narrow entrance, high and tapered on the atrium side and with another doorway onto the peristyle.

 

The first room, 46, had well-decorated walls, but of which only traces were preserved. The mosaic floor with a white background, would have had a picture in the centre, or a precious decoration, which was probably taken off at the time of the first excavation. Around, on the white background, straight black bands, formed rectangles variously arranged.

 

The other room (47) similarly had the walls decorated with painting, which was evidenced by the remains of the red painted zoccolo.  It appears that the flooring was of cocciopesto. In the wall that this room linked through to the tablinum were two windows.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. December 2004. Looking south across site of tablinum and peristyle, and towards remains of VII.6.28. According to Boyce, in the right ala of the atrium stood a large masonry podium, which Fiorelli thought may have been the base of a Lararium. See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14.  (p.67. no.288).

VII.6.7 Pompeii. December 2004. Looking south across site of tablinum and peristyle, and towards remains of VII.6.28.

 

Notizie degli Scavi, 1910, p.454-461

The Peristyle 48 (Fig. 7 – Page 457) onto which the tablinum opened almost in all its width with a doorway with a travertine threshold, and the door-jambs at one time covered with wood, had the portico around all sides except at the south, where, instead there was a wall decorated with three semi-columns (Fig. 7, letter a). The columns, made of tiles and plaster, were smooth; with a high red zoccolo, while at the top they were white. They were all missing their capitals. There were three per side, repeating twice at the corners, and instead of being arranged at equal intervals, they were spaced away from each other a little depending on the width of the doorways that opened around the portico.

 

At the first column to the right of the western walkway was a semi-column in the wall. Of the semi-columns of the southern wall only part of the zoccolo remains. In one was preserved, the white vertical stripes, with which they wanted to imitate the decorative relief. It is not known whether the columns supported a roof or a terrace. Between the columns was a pluteus in rough masonry, interrupted near the doorway of the tablinum, instead replaced by another lower pluteus near the entrance doorway in 51.

 

In the internal wall of the pluteus, was the usual gutter, which was of cocciopesto, in which, in addition to collecting the water of the terrace, also drained some small courses opened through the pluteus, courses by which, according to me, other water could not flow other than that used to do the cleaning of the floor of the portico. This flooring was of cocciopesto.

 

The west wall preserved a mediocre painted decoration, consisting of a very high black zoccolo/plinth (higher up, the wall was white), partitioned into squares by green bands.

 

The area or small garden preserved two masonry beds y (and fig. 7, letter b,)  0.26m high, painted in red, with within the plant soil, in which, were made the usual explorations, we found the holes left by the roots from the plants, and indicated in relief with dots and in Fig. 7 by means of dry twigs stuffed into the holes. (See figure 7 on page 457).

 

Of the southern wall of the peristyle, only the lower part was preserved, and on this was shown a wooden pluteus, formed by crossing bands several times, as was seen in many other paintings of this kind. Without a doubt, however, this pluteus indicated the front closure of a garden depicted on the entire wall, with a painting which one would have wanted to give the illusion that a real garden would follow from the small peristyle. It was, in short, a representation of opera topiaria, a kind of painting, of which we will have occasion to speak more extensively (ss V. Page 470).

 

At the extreme right end of this wall was a rectangular niche, perhaps a sacrarium.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii.  About 1910.  Peristyle garden.  
Looking south from north-west corner across two U-shaped masonry flower beds formed by low walls (0.26m. high), originally painted red and filled with soil.
According to Jashemski, the garden at the rear of the tablinum was enclosed on the east, north and west by a portico supported by 7 columns, red below and white above. All lacked capitals at the time of excavation. The rear (south) wall was divided into panels by engaged columns, similar to the columns of the portico. The columns were connected by a low wall, except for a wide entrance to the garden opposite the tablinum: the wall was lower in front of the large room (51) on the east (Jashemski’s plan numbered this room as (b). The panels appear to have been painted with garden paintings. A water channel outlined the garden. There was a cistern opening near the middle column on the north side. Spano found root cavities in the soil of the U-shaped masonry flower beds, but they were not emptied of lapilli, measured or studied. Twenty-eight cavities are indicated on his plan. In the south wall, near the south-east (?) corner of the peristyle was a square niche. 
On page 362, no.76, Jashemski wrote – at the time of excavation only the lower part of the rear (south) wall of the garden at the back of the house still had plaster, this was painted to represent a wooden fence (see also Jashemski, vol.1: fig.44 on page 30) which led Spano to believe that there had been a garden painting above. Nothing remains today, for this house was destroyed in 1943. 
See Jashemski, W. F., 1993. The Gardens of Pompeii, Volume II: Appendices. New York: Caratzas. (p.184) and (362, no.76).
Her sources included – Spano, Notizie degli Scavi, (1910) pp. 456-457; Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. (p. 67 no. 289)

The area was devastated in the 1943 bombing.  
The staircase on the east side is the only part still visible in situ.
At the rear of the staircase can be seen two small rooms, the latrine and the kitchen.
According to Boyce: the square niche on the south wall of the peristyle, near the south-west (?) corner, was coated with successive layers of stucco in red green and yellow.
See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14.  (p.67. no.289).
Photograph courtesy of Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei. (Negative C359)

VII.6.7 Pompeii.  About 1910.  Peristyle garden. 

Looking south from north-west corner across two U-shaped masonry flower beds formed by low walls (0.26m. high), originally painted red and filled with soil.

According to Jashemski, the garden at the rear of the tablinum was enclosed on the east, north and west by a portico supported by 7 columns, red below and white above. All lacked capitals at the time of excavation. The rear (south) wall was divided into panels by engaged columns, similar to the columns of the portico. The columns were connected by a low wall, except for a wide entrance to the garden opposite the tablinum: the wall was lower in front of the large room (51) on the east (Jashemski’s plan numbered this room as (b). The panels appear to have been painted with garden paintings. A water channel outlined the garden. There was a cistern opening near the middle column on the north side. Spano found root cavities in the soil of the U-shaped masonry flower beds, but they were not emptied of lapilli, measured or studied. Twenty-eight cavities are indicated on his plan. In the south wall, near the south-east (?) corner of the peristyle was a square niche.

On page 362, no.76, Jashemski wrote – at the time of excavation only the lower part of the rear (south) wall of the garden at the back of the house still had plaster, this was painted to represent a wooden fence (see also Jashemski, vol.1: fig.44 on page 30) which led Spano to believe that there had been a garden painting above. Nothing remains today, for this house was destroyed in 1943.

See Jashemski, W. F., 1993. The Gardens of Pompeii, Volume II: Appendices. New York: Caratzas. (p.184) and (362, no.76).

Her sources included – Spano, Notizie degli Scavi, (1910) pp. 456-457; Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. (p. 67 no. 289)

 

The area was devastated in the 1943 bombing. 

The staircase on the east side is the only part still visible in situ.

At the rear of the staircase can be seen two small rooms, the latrine and the kitchen.

According to Boyce: the square niche on the south wall of the peristyle, near the south-west (?) corner, was coated with successive layers of stucco in red green and yellow.

See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14.  (p.67. no.289).

Photograph courtesy of Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei. (Negative C359)

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. Found 6th March 1762. Wall painting of The Birth of Venus in a shell on the sea. Now in Naples Archaeological Museum.  Inventory number 27704. See Pagano, M. and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli  Naples : Nicola Longobardi.  (p. 40).
See De Caro, S., Ed., 2000. The Secret Cabinet in the National Archaeological Museum of Naples. Napoli: Electa. (p.26).
See Richardson, L., 2000. A Catalog of Identifiable Figure Painters of Ancient Pompeii, Herculaneum. Baltimore: John Hopkins. (p. 94 and p. 103)

VII.6.7 Pompeii. Found 6th March 1762 on the south wall of the peristyle. Wall painting of The Birth of Venus in a shell on the sea.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 27704.

See Pagano, M. and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples: Nicola Longobardi, (p. 40).

See De Caro, S., Ed., 2000. The Secret Cabinet in the National Archaeological Museum of Naples. Napoli: Electa. (p.26).

See Richardson, L., 2000. A Catalog of Identifiable Figure Painters of Ancient Pompeii, Herculaneum. Baltimore: John Hopkins. (p. 94 and p. 103).

See Siotto, E. Considerazioni su un intervento recente al “quadro” parietale della Venere nella Conchiglia; in Rivista di Studi Pompeiani XVII, 2006, (p.79-87).

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. December 2004. Looking south across remains of tablinum and the oecus on its east side, in forefront of photo.
At the rear can be seen the stairs (centre) and the site of the peristyle, through the tablinum.
The column against the wall on the left, would appear to be in the doorway of Room 51.
On the immediate left would be the area of room 49, a triclinium.
According to Blake, commenting on the damage done by the winter weather, stated that –
“The vase/kantharos which once formed the threshold of a triclinium opening off the peristyle of VII.6.7 disappeared almost completely during the winter of 1928”.
See Blake, M., (1930). The pavements of the Roman Buildings of the Republic and Early Empire. Rome, MAAR, 8, (p.12).

VII.6.7 Pompeii. December 2004. Looking south across remains of tablinum and the oecus on its east side, in forefront of photo.

At the rear can be seen the stairs (centre) and the site of the peristyle, through the tablinum.

The column against the wall on the left, would appear to be in the doorway of Room 51.

On the immediate left would be the area of room 49, a triclinium.

According to Blake, commenting on the damage done by the winter weather, stated that –

“The vase/kantharos which once formed the threshold of a triclinium opening off the peristyle of VII.6.7 disappeared almost completely during the winter of 1928”.

See Blake, M., (1930). The pavements of the Roman Buildings of the Republic and Early Empire. Rome, MAAR, 8, (p.12).

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. May 2011. 
Looking south across site of atrium towards remains of dividing wall between oecus on east side of tablinum, on left.  
On the right would be the east side of the tablinum, looking towards site of garden area, and towards VII.6.28.
Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. May 2011.

Looking south across site of atrium towards remains of dividing wall between oecus on east side of tablinum, on left. 

On the right would be the east side of the tablinum, looking towards site of garden area, and towards VII.6.28. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. September 2005. Stairs of the east wall of the peristyle of VII.6.7 are on the left,  The east wall of the latrine of VII.6.7 is centre left,  and VII.6.28 on the right, behind the column. According to Spano in NdS, at the rear of the eastern walkway (of the peristyle) there was a brick staircase with an arch below.  This staircase led up to some rooms existing above the ground floor rooms numbered 56 and 57. The entry to these two rooms was through a small doorway on the right of the staircase. Of these two rooms, number 56 was the latrine, and number 57 was the kitchen. See Spano in Notizie di Scavi, 1910, (p.460)

VII.6.7 Pompeii. September 2005. Stairs of the east wall of the peristyle of VII.6.7 are on the left.

The east wall of the latrine of VII.6.7 is centre left, and VII.6.28 on the right, behind the column.

According to Spano in NdS, at the rear of the eastern walkway (of the peristyle) there was a brick staircase with an arch below.

This staircase led up to some rooms existing above the ground floor rooms numbered 56 and 57.

The entry to these two rooms was through a small doorway on the right of the staircase.

Of these two rooms, number 56 was the latrine, and number 57 was the kitchen.

See Spano in Notizie degli Scavi, 1910, (p.460)

 

Notizie degli Scavi, 1910, p.454-461

Under the portico opened several rooms.

 

The first on the left, 49, was rectangular in shape, it was vast, with a floor of signinum, whose design was almost entirely destroyed, and preserved traces of painted decoration on the walls, a trace consisting of a portion of black zoccolo/plinth partitioned in squaring by means of white lines. The entrance had a lava threshold, and on the right of it was a large window that gave onto the peristyle. Given the shape of the room and its proximity to the kitchen, 57, it is likely to have been a triclinium.

 

To the right of the east wall are some steps in masonry. On them it was probable that a wooden staircase was placed, by which to climb to an upper floor. This stairway would partially have covered the small room, 50, with cocciopesto floor, which likewise was also entered from the described triclinium.

 

The room 51 follows, which opens onto the peristyle almost in all its width, and from whose entrance doorway, it seems, that our predecessors in the excavation had removed the threshold, probably of marble. The room was large and rectangular in shape; it had a mosaic floor, and a recess for the side of a bed in the far right end of the northern wall, a bed, therefore, which was put along the wall of the room, thus was known the location. The mosaic of the floor was white, with double black band around and inlaid with random pieces of dark marble here and there. In the centre most probably was a decoration or a picture that could have been removed. Nothing existed of the painted decoration other than remains of a large yellow rectangle and of a yellow zoccolo.

 

A smaller cubiculum, but not less elegant, opened into the opposite walkway, in 52.  To the left of the small entrance there was a large window z, made entirely of wood, of which remained a very bright trace, with low masonry pluteus. The division of the doorway from the window was made by means of a wooden pillar. The entrance had a lava threshold, on the left with iron hinge preserved and on the right, the hole of the other hinge, which was lost.

 

The small room had the facing wall partitioned by two yellow rectangles with a violet/peacock blue cornice around, separated by a large yellow band, on which was a painted candelabra, which intruded onto the frieze, which was white. The larger side walls had three painted rectangles each, of which the two opposite and closest to the facing wall were yellow, while the others were violet/peacock blue. This apparent irregularity indicated how the bottom of the small room was reserved for containing the bed. In the white frieze of the facing wall was a lunette (small window), accompanied externally in a semicircle of holes for the support beams of a vault. This, however, most likely, was as long as the space destined for the bed, that is, that of the two yellow rectangles opposite, where the remaining front was covered by a platform, as they explain/show in many other Pompeian cubicula, for example those noted in the House known as the House of the Silver Wedding.  At the vault, which was always set lower than the platform, were suspended curtains by which an alcove was formed with the bed inside. The side violet/peacock blue rectangles were partitioned by a yellow band with a painted candelabra. In the middle of each of these rectangles is or was or there was a very small rectangular square. Of these were preserved the two of the front/facing wall, each of which exhibited a vista of small buildings gathered together, devoid of any importance whatsoever; also preserved was the last on the right of the northern wall, where you can see a painted representation of two hares or dogs chasing to the right.

 

The frieze was preserved only in the front/facing wall, where, as I have said, it had the form of a lunette and was white. It was decorated with bands and swirls and with two garlands. At the top, in correspondence with the painted high candelabra dividing the rectangles, was a painted flying yellow Cupid, with arms symmetrically carried forward, bearing with his hands something which I could not distinguish, and which transforms lower down into two scrolls. The black zoccolo, is partitioned into panelled squares by means of white lines, squares in correspondence of the rectangles and the lines dividing these, so as to result in two wider, with a narrower one in the middle. The first of these exhibited the usual plants; the second a yellow suspended basket, with arched handle, laden with fruit, with hanging ribbons. The mosaic floor had a white background, double black band around, and in the middle a square exhibiting a star resulting from eight white diamonds with black band around, each comprising a smaller, red diamond. At the four inner corners of the square, were four white squares, each with another red smaller, in the middle. Near the threshold, the mosaic showed the representation of a kantharos of white, red and black colour.

 

Another room followed to the north, 53, with a wide entrance, originally with wooden doorjambs, but it seemed without door shutters, with a threshold of Signinum showing a band with double rows of semicircle arches against each other, in white tesserae widely placed.

The room was square, and each wall showed three large rectangles, of which the central was violet/peacock blue, with yellow side ones, partitioned by large white bands among them.  A frieze, with a white background, was decorated with variously arranged bands and swirls; the black zoccolo had wide and narrow paintings, according to what they corresponded to, the rectangles or to the dividing bands.

The first offered two grazing geese, facing each other, with two garlands above them; the second the usual plants. In front of each central rectangle, two slender green Ionic columns supporting a flat green entablature.

At the sides, and only in the front/facing wall, two candelabra, red and yellow, encroaching on the frieze, where they ended with a circular plate, on which rises something, which together with the plate were covered with a red cloth.

The middle rectangles, preserved only on the north and west walls, showed in the centre, a winged Cupid, bearing an object in each hand, and ending below in two scrolls (volutes - a motif dear to Hellenistic and Hellenistic-Roman decorative art); all in yellow. The Cupid of the wall in front/facing had a small basket in the lowered right hand, and in the other an object that seemed to look like a bird; the Cupid of the north wall had a shepherd’s crook in his left hand and in the other an object that is not distinguishable. In each side rectangle was an elongated, tiny painting, showing a Bull or a Sea Horse, on a green background, which were more or less preserved or destroyed.

The floor was of Signinum, decorated with white tesserae, placed at equal distances, and thus forming parallel rows in each sense. To the right of the entrance, at the top, was a window.

 

The next room, to the north, 54, had an entrance with lave threshold, originally with wooden doorposts, and had a wide window onto the peristyle, to the left of it. The room was square and showed only very scarce remains of painted decoration; The floor was of signinum, decorated with pieces of white tesserae, arranged in parallel rows.

 

Another room 55, follows to the north, with flooring of cocciopesto and unadorned walls.

 

At the bottom of the eastern walkway, rises a masonry staircase (fig,7, letter “e”) with arch below. By this, one climbed up to some small rooms, above the rooms on the ground floor at 56 and 57, into which you entered through a small doorway to the right of the staircase.

 

Of these rooms, the first (56) was a latrine, the second (57) was a kitchen.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. 
Room 52, mosaic floor with white background, in the middle was a square showing a star resulting from eight white diamonds with black band around, each comprising a smaller, red diamond.  
DAIR 41.738. Photo © Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Abteilung Rom, Arkiv.
See Pernice, E.  1938. Pavimente und Figürliche Mosaiken: Die Hellenistische Kunst in Pompeji, Band VI. Berlin: de Gruyter, (p.89-90, and taf. 41,4 above).
According to PPM –
“The floors were for the most part in cocciopesto, lavapesta intermingled with brick, or white mosaic with emblemata already removed during the explorations of the Bourbon age (cf. PAH 1,2, p.144, 10 April 1762) and today no longer found, although documented by Pernice. 
Among the lost motifs are the hexagon with prospective cube of tiles in the cubiculum (40), or the 8-pointed star resulting from the combination of its many diamond-shapes inserted into a square in the cubiculum (52), a room also known for the lowered vaulted cover on the alcove and flat ceiling on the rest of the room, or finally the kantharos outlined in black, red, yellow and white tesserae, placed in the threshold of the triclinium and destroyed by the roots of spontaneous vegetation in the winter of 1928.”
( I pavimenti erano per lo piu in cocciopesto, lavapesta con frammisti laterizi che ne ravvivavano il colore o a mosaico bianco con emblemata gia asportati durante l’esplorazione di eta borbonica (cfr, PAH 1,2, p.144, 10 aprile 1762) e oggi non piu riscontrabili, anche se documentati da Pernice. 
Tra i motivi perduti ricordiamo l’esagono con cubo prospettico di piastrelle nel cubicolo (40), o la stella a 8 punte risultante dalla combinazione di altrettanti rombi inserita in un quadrato nel cubicolo (52), ambiente notevole anche per la copertura a volta ribassata sul’alcova e piana sulla restante parte della stanza, o, infine, il kantharos delineato in tessere nere, rosse, gialle e bianche, posto nella soglia del triclinio e distrutto dalle radici della vegetazione spontanea nell’inverno del 1928. 
See PPM, VII, 7, (p.176)

VII.6.7 Pompeii. c.1930.

Room 52, mosaic floor with white background, in the middle was a square showing a star resulting from eight white diamonds with black band around, each comprising a smaller, red diamond.  

DAIR 41.738. Photo © Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Abteilung Rom, Arkiv.

See Pernice, E.  1938. Pavimente und Figürliche Mosaiken: Die Hellenistische Kunst in Pompeji, Band VI. Berlin: de Gruyter, (p.89-90, and taf. 41,4 above).

According to PPM –

The floors were for the most part in cocciopesto, lavapesta intermingled with brick, or white mosaic with emblemata already removed during the explorations of the Bourbon age (cf. PAH 1,2, p.144, 10 April 1762) and today no longer found, although documented by Pernice.

Among the lost motifs are the hexagon with prospective cube of tiles in the cubiculum (40), or the 8-pointed star resulting from the combination of its many diamond-shapes inserted into a square in the cubiculum (52), a room also known for the lowered vaulted cover on the alcove and flat ceiling on the rest of the room, or finally the kantharos outlined in black, red, yellow and white tesserae, placed in the threshold of the triclinium and destroyed by the roots of spontaneous vegetation in the winter of 1928.”

( I pavimenti erano per lo piu in cocciopesto, lavapesta con frammisti laterizi che ne ravvivavano il colore o a mosaico bianco con emblemata gia asportati durante l’esplorazione di eta borbonica (cfr, PAH 1,2, p.144, 10 aprile 1762) e oggi non piu riscontrabili, anche se documentati da Pernice.

Tra i motivi perduti ricordiamo l’esagono con cubo prospettico di piastrelle nel cubicolo (40), o la stella a 8 punte risultante dalla combinazione di altrettanti rombi inserita in un quadrato nel cubicolo (52), ambiente notevole anche per la copertura a volta ribassata sul’alcova e piana sulla restante parte della stanza, o, infine, il kantharos delineato in tessere nere, rosse, gialle e bianche, posto nella soglia del triclinio e distrutto dalle radici della vegetazione spontanea nell’inverno del 1928.

See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici. VII,7, Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, (p. 176.)

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii.  17th January 1762.  “Found within 30 paces from where we found the Diana (VII.6.3)”. Wall painting of shrine within an enclosure.  Now in Naples Archaeological Museum.  Inventory number 9494. See Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli: Una lettura integrata, coordinata e commentata della documentazione Volume 1.  Naples : Nicola Longobardi.  (p40).

VII.6.7 Pompeii. 17th January 1762.

“Found within 30 paces from where we found the Diana (VII.6.3)”. Wall painting of shrine within an enclosure. 

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9494.

See Pagano, M. and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples: Nicola Longobardi.  (p40).

 

 VII.6.7 Pompeii. Late 19th century postcard. Looking north from above atrium and impluvium of VII.6.7.  The entrance doorway would have been the one on the right of the centre of the photo. This shows the north wall of the atrium, and the rear of VII.6.4, 5 and 6. The entrance doorway leading into the atrium of VII.6.3 can be seen on the left. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. Late 19th century postcard. Looking north from above atrium and impluvium of VII.6.7.

The entrance doorway would have been the one on the right of the centre of the photo.

This shows the north wall of the atrium and the impluvium in its centre, and the rear of VII.6.4, 5 and 6.

The entrance doorway leading into the atrium of VII.6.3 can be seen on the left. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. c.1880-1890.  G. Sommer no.  1259. Looking north from above atrium of VII.6.7.  The entrance doorway would have been the one on the right of the centre of the photo. This shows the north wall of the atrium, and the rear of VII.6.4, 5 and 6.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. c.1880-1890.  G. Sommer no. 1259. Looking north from above atrium of VII.6.7.

The entrance doorway would have been the one on the right of the centre of the photo.

This shows the north wall of the atrium, and the rear of VII.6.4, 5 and 6. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. Undated postcard. Looking north from above atrium of VII.6.7. 
The entrance doorway would have been the one on the right of the centre of the photo, opposite Via Consolare.
This shows the north wall of the atrium, at the rear of VII.6.4, 5 and 6. Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. Undated postcard. Looking north from above atrium of VII.6.7.

The entrance doorway would have been the one on the right of the centre of the photo, opposite Via Consolare.

This shows the north wall of the atrium, at the rear of VII.6.4, 5 and 6. Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. Abt. 1870.  Looking north from above atrium of VII.6.7 on left, and atrium of VII.6.11 on right. The entrance doorway of VII.6.7 would have been the one on the left of the photo. This would have led into the atrium, on the left of the entrance upon entering there would have been a cubiculum. This can be seen here on the right of the entrance, in the middle of the photo.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. Abt. 1870.  Looking north from above atrium of VII.6.7 on left, and atrium of VII.6.11 on right.

The entrance doorway of VII.6.7 would have been the one on the left of the photo.

This would have led into the atrium, on the left of the entrance upon entering there would have been a cubiculum.

This can be seen here on the right of the entrance, in the middle of the lower part of the photo.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii.  Looking north across north side of insula VII.6, lower photo, across to Via Consolare and junction with Vicolo di Modesto, centre left, and VI.6, centre right. The entrance doorway of VII.6.7 would have been the one on the left of the photo.  Photo by permission of the Institute of Archaeology, University of Oxford. File name instarchbx208im011. Source ID. 44337.

VII.6.7 Pompeii.

Looking north across north side of insula VII.6, lower photo, across to Via Consolare and junction with Vicolo di Modesto, centre left, and VI.6, centre right.

The entrance doorway of VII.6.7 would have been the one on the left of the photo.

Photo by permission of the Institute of Archaeology, University of Oxford. File name instarchbx208im011. Source ID. 44337.

See photo on University of Oxford HEIR database

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. From an album by Roberto Rive, dated 1868. 
Looking north towards the entrance doorway, centre left in photo. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. From an album by Roberto Rive, dated 1868.

Looking north towards the entrance doorway, centre left in photo. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VII.6.7 Pompeii. 1910 piano di Spano.
Vedi Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, 1910, fig. 1, p. 437.

VII.6.7 Pompeii. 1910 piano di Spano.

Vedi Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, 1910, fig. 1, p. 437.

 

From Notizie degli Scavi, 1910, p.454-461

(Il n. VII è vano d'ingresso di una casa. Gli stipiti sono fatti con pezzi di tegole; vi è soglia di lava tra essi, a cui segue un piccolo vestibolo, dopo del quale è la soglia della porta, parimenti di lava. La casa risulta di tutte e tre le parti principali, di atrio, di tablino e di peristilio ; le due prime parti esattamente in asse tra loro, la terza leggermente spostata ad oriente. Fu construita in tempo antichissimo, come risulta dai parallelepipedi di pietra di Sarno qua e la adoperati nella costruzione, e dai vani alti e rastremati; pero fu in vari punti posteriormente rifatti.

 

Le fauces 38 hanno il pavimento di coccio pesto, alquanto inclinato verso la via, e le pareti conservano scarsi avanzi d’intonaco affatto logorato nella superficie. Gli angoli verso l’atrio erano rivestiti di legno.

 

L'atrio 39 era tuscanico. Ha pavimento di coccio pesto con larga fascia di opus segmentatimi intorno all'impluvio che è di forma quasi quadrata, con fondo formato del pari da opus segmentatum.

 

Intorno all'atrio si aprono diversi ambienti, caratteristici appunto per i loro vani in buona parte con stipiti di calcare, e che, quantunque conservati solo nella parte inferiore, mostrano dal loro insieme di essere stati alti e rastremati.

 

Il primo vano a sinistra introduce nella stanza 40; ha soglia di travertino coi fori per l'incastro degli stipiti di legno, quelli pei cardini e un ultimo pel pessulus. La stanza aveva le pareti dipinte, decorazione di cui avanza solo lo zoccolo rosso, diviso in riquadrature da lineette chiare ; pavimento di musaico bianco con doppia fascia nera intorno e recante un esagono al centro formato da tre rombi di marmo colorato, con cornice a fascette nere, bianche e rosse.

 

Nella parete settentrionale un piccolo vano murato, che dava nel dietro-bottega di VIII (7.6.8), bottega dunque che in un tempo più antico fu in diretta comunicazione con questa casa, come lo prova pure un alto vano murato, esistente nella parete settentrionale dell'atrio a destra delle fauces. Di fronte (opposite) alla descritta stanza, è in 41, alla estremità destra del lato occidentale, una piccola cella recante scarsi avanzi d'intonaco, che, almeno oggi, si mostra disadorno, e con la parete occidentale fortemente inclinata in avanti.

 

Segue in 42 un' apotheca dal vano rastremato, che fa esatto riscontro al vano d'ingresso in 40, che ha di fronte.

 

Ai due lati, nel fondo, le alae 43 e 44.

 

La prima (43) ha intonaco corroso nella pareti, pavimento molto grossolano, costituito da pezzetti di marmo incrostati nel terriccio e reca traccia di stipite di legno a sinistra dell'ingresso, con cuscinetto di marmo munito del foro per l'incastro di quello.

 

L'ala di fronte, 44, ha ugual pavimento, avanzi sulle pareti di grandi rettangoli rossi, cuscinetto di marmo a destra del vano, che sosteneva lo stipite di legno. Addossati alla parete di fronte (occidentale) due alti scalini in muratura, forse avanzi di un sacrarium.

 

Il tablino 45 è vasto, ha pavimento di signino, esibente filari paralleli di tesselle bianche messe ad uguali intervalli, una linea meandrica al posto della soglia dalla parte dell'atrio, e un quadrato nel mezzo con entro un cerchio decorato a sua volta con linee formanti rombi. Le pareti conservano scarsi avanzi di intonaco corroso. I pilastri all'ingresso avevano stipiti di legno, dei quali si conservano i cuscinetti di marmo.

 

Ai lati del tablino due stanze, 46 e 47, entrambe con ingresso stretto, alto e rastremato dal lato dell'atrio e con altro vano sul peristilio.

 

Il primo ambiente, 46, aveva pareti ben decorate, di cui si conservano soltanto delle tracce. 11 pavimento a musaico con fondo bianco, doveva avere un quadro nel centro, o un ornato di pregio, che probabilmente fu tolto al tempo del primo scavo. Intorno, sul fondo bianco, fascette nere rettilinee, formanti dei rettangoli variamente disposti.

 

L'altra stanza (47) aveva parimente le pareti ornate con pittura, di che è testimone l'avanzo dello zoccolo dipinto in rosso. Pare che il pavimento fosse di coccio pesto.  Nella parete che questa stanza aveva comune col tablino erano due finestre.

 

Il peristilio 48 (fig. 7 – page 457) sul quale il tablino si apre quasi in tutta la sua larghezza, con un vano dalla soglia di travertino e dagli stipiti una volta rivestiti di legno, ha il portico intorno a tutti i lati tranne che a mezzogiorno, dove, invece è una parete decorata con tre semi-colonne (fig. 7, lettera a). Le colonne, fatte di tegole ed intonaco, sono lisce ; recano un alto zoccolo rosso mentre in alto sono bianche. Mancano tutte del capitello. Esse ricorrono in numero di tre per lato, ripetendo due volte le angolari, e invece di essere disposte ad uguali intervalli, si allontanano tra loro presso a poco secondo l'ampiezza dei vani che si aprono intorno al portico.

 

Alla prima colonna a destra dell'ambulacro occidentale corrisponde una semicolonna nella parete. Delle semicolonne della parete meridionale rimane soltanto la parte degli zoccoli. In uno si conservano delle fascette verticali bianche, con le quali si volle imitare la baccellatura. Non si sa se le colonne sostenessero un tetto o una terrazza. Tra le colonne è un pluteo in muratura grezza, interrotto in corrispondenza del vano del tablino, inoltre, sostituito da altro pluteo più basso in corrispondenza del vano d'ingresso in 51.

 

Nella parete interna del pluteo la solita cunetta, che è di coccio pesto, nella quale, oltre a raccogliersi le acque della terrazza, si scaricavano pure alcuni piccolo corsi praticati attraverso il pluteo, corsi pei quali, secondo che a me pare, non poteva scorrere altra acqua che quella adoperata per fare la pulizia del pavimento del portico. Questo pavimento è di coccio pesto.

 

La parete occidentale conserva una mediocre decorazione dipinta, consistente in un altissimo zoccolo nero (più in alto la parete è bianca), scompartito in riquadrature da fasce verdi.

 

L'area o piccolo giardino conserva due aiuole in muratura “y” (e fig. 7, lettera b,) alte m. 0,26, dipinte in rosso, con entro il terreno vegetale, nel quale, fatte le solite esplorazioni, abbiamo trovato i fori lasciati dalle radici dalle piante, e indicati nel rilievo con puntini e nella fig. 7 per mezzo di ramoscelli secchi ficcati nei fori stessi.

 

See fig. 7 on page 457.

 

Della parete meridionale del peristilio non si conserva che la sola parte bassa, e su questa è rappresentato un pluteo di legno, formato da stanghette incrociantisi più volte, come vedesi in molte altre pitture del genere. Senza dubbio però questo pluteo indicava la chiusura anteriore di un giardino rappresentato sull'intera parete, con la quale pittura si voleva dare l'illusione che un vero giardino seguisse al piccolo peristilio. Era, insomma, una rappresentanza di opera topiaria, genere di dipinti, del quale avremo subito occasione di parlare più estesamente. (Vedi. p.470).

 

Alla estremità destra di detta parete una nicchietta rettangolare, forse un sacrarium.

 

Sotto il portico si aprono diverse stanze.

 

La prima a sinistra 49. di forma rettangolare, è vasta, ha pavimento di signino. il cui disegno è quasi interamente distrutto, e conserva traccia di decorazione dipinta sulle pareti, traccia consistente in una porzione di zoccolo nero scompartito in riquadrature per mezzo di linee chiare. L'ingresso ha soglia di lava, ed a destra di esso è una grande finestra che dà nel peristilio. Data la forma della stanza e la sua vicinanza con la cucinetta 57, è probabile che trattisi di un triclinio.

 

A destra della parete orientale sono pochi scalini in muratura. Su di essi è probabile che poggiasse una scala di legno, per la quale si saliva ad un piano superiore. Questa scala copriva in parte il piccolo ambiente 50, dal pavimento di coccio pesto, nel quale si entrava parimente dal descritto triclinio.

 

Segue la stanza 51, che si apre sul peristilio quasi in tutta la sua larghezza, e dal cui vano d'ingresso, pare, che i nostri predecessori nello scavo avessero tolta la soglia, probabilmente di marmo. L'ambiente è di forma rettangolare, grande ; ha pavimento di musaico, ed un incavo per la sponda di un letto nella estremità destra della parete settentrionale, letto, quindi, che era messo lungo la parete di fronte della stanza, della quale per tale particolare ci è dunque nota la destinazione. Il musaico del pavimento è bianco, con doppia fascia nera intorno e pezzetti informi di marmo oscuro qua e là incrostati. Al centro molto probabilmente era un ornamento o un quadro che potè essere tolto. Della decorazione dipinta non esistono che avanzi di grandi rettangoli gialli, e di uno zoccolo dello stesso colore.

 

Un cubicolo più piccolo, ma non meno elegante, si apre nell'ambulacro opposto, in 52. A sinistra del piccolo ingresso aprivasi una grande finestra z, fatta tutta di legno, della quale rimane vivissima traccia, con basso pluteo in muratura. La divisione del vano dalla finestra era fatta per mezzo di un pilastro di legno. L'ingresso ha soglia di lava, con cardine di ferro conservato a sinistra e il foro dell'altro cardine, perduto, a destra.

La stanzetta ha la parete di fronte scompartita in due rettangoli gialli con cornice paonazza intorno, separati da una larga fascia parimenti gialla, sulla quale un candelabro, il quale invade il fregio, che è bianco. Le pareti laterali, più larghe, recano tre rettangoli ciascuna, dei quali i due opposti e più vicini alla parete di fronte sono gialli, mentre gli altri sono paonazzi. Questa apparente irregolarità indica come il fondo della stanzetta fosse riservato a contenere il letto. Il fregio bianco della parete di fronte è una lunetta, accompagnata esternamente in semicerchio dai fori dei travicelli di sostegno di una volticina. Questa però, assai probabilmente, era lunga quanto lo spazio destinato al letto, cioè quello dei due rettangoli gialli opposti, laddove la rimanente parte anteriore era coperta da una piattabanda, come insegnano molti altri cubicoli pompeiani, per esempio quelli notevolissimi dellacasa detta delle Nozze di Argento. Alla volticina, impostata sempre più in basso della piattabanda, erano sospese delle tendine, per le quali veniva a formarsi un'alcova con dentro il letto. I rettangoli paonazzi laterali sono fra loro scompartiti da una fascia gialla con candelabro. Nel mezzo di ciascuno di questi rettangoli è o vi era un quadretto rettangolare, piccolissimo. Di essi son conservati i due della parete di fronte, ciascuno dei quali esibisce una veduta di piccoli fabbricati riuniti insieme, privi affatto di qualsiasi importanza; inoltre è conservato l'ultimo a destra della parete settentrionale, nel quale vedesi la rappresentanza di due lepri o cani inseguentisi a destra.

 

Il fregio è conservato solo nella parete di fronte, dove, come ho detto, ha forma di lunetta ed è bianco. È decorato con fasce e rabeschi e con due festoni. In alto, in corrispondenza del piattello dell'alto candelabro divisorio dei rettangoli, un Eros volante di prospetto, tutto giallo, con le braccia simmetricamente portate innanzi, recante con le mani qualche cosa che non arrivo a distinguere, e che si trasforma inferiormente in due volute. Lo zoccolo, nero, è scompartito in riquadrature per mezzo di lineette chiare, riquadrature in corrispondenza dei rettangoli e delle fasce divisorie di questi, in modo da risultarne due più larghe, con in mezzo una più stretta.  Le prime di queste esibiscono le solite piante ; le seconde un paniere giallo sospeso, con manico ad arco, carico di frutti, con nastri pendenti. Il pavimento a mosaico ha fondo bianco, doppia fascia nera intorno, e in mezzo un quadrato esibente una stella risultante da otto rombi bianchi con fascetta nera intorno, ciascuno comprendente un rombo più piccolo, rosso. Ai quattro angoli interni del quadrato, Quattro quadratini bianchi, ciascuno con un altro minore, rosso, al centro. Vicinissimo poi alla soglia, il musaico esibisce la rappresentanza di un kantharos di colore bianco,rosso e nero.

 

Segue a settentrione un'altra stanza, 53, con largo ingresso, in origine con stipiti di legno, pare senza battenti, con soglia di signino esibente una fascia con doppio filare di semicerchi vòlti gli uni contro gli altri, a tesselle bianche largamente disposte.  La stanza è quadrata, e ciascuna parete offre tre grandi rettangoli, dei quali il centrale paonazzo, i laterali gialli, tra loro scompartiti da larghe fasce bianche. Un fregio, a fondo bianco, è decorato con fasce e rabeschi variamente disposti; lo zoccolo nero ha riquadrature larghe e strette, secondo che corrispondono ai rettangoli od alle fasce divisorie. Le prime offrono due oche pascolanti, affrontate, con sopra due festoni ; le seconde le solite piante. Dinanzi a ciascun rettangolo centrale, due esili colonnine verdi, di tipo ionico, sostenenti una trabeazione piana, verde. Ai lati, e solo nella parete di fronte, due candelabri, color rosso e giallo, invadenti il fregio, dove terminano con piattello circolare, sul quale si eleva qualche cosa, che insieme col piattello è coperta da un panno rosso. I rettangoli medi, conservati solo nelle pareti settentrionale e occidentale, esibiscono al centro un Eros alato di prospetto, recante un oggetto in ciascuna mano, e terminante inferiormente in due volute (motivo caro all'arte decorativa ellenistica ed ellenistico-romana); il tutto giallo. Quello della parete di fronte ha nella destra abbassata un panierino, e nell'altra un oggetto che pare un volatile; l'Eros della parete settentrionale ha nella sinistra un pedum e nell'altra un oggetto che non distinguo che cosa sia. In ciascun rettangolo laterale un quadretto allungato, piccolissimo, esibente un toro od un cavallo marino, su fondo verde, dove più, dove meno conservato e dove distrutto. Il pavimento è di signino, decorato con tesselle bianche, poste a distanze uguali, e costituenti quindi filari paralleli in ciascun senso. A destra dello ingresso, in alto, un finestrino.

 

La stanza seguente, a settentrione, 54, ha ingresso con soglia di lava, in origine con stipiti di legno, ed ha larga finestra nel peristilio, a sinistra di esso. La stanza è quadrata e reca solo scarsissimi avanzi di decorazione dipinta ; il pavimento è di signino, decorato con pezzetti di tesselle bianche, disposti

in filari paralleli.

 

Segue, parimenti a settentrione, un altro ambiente, 55, dal pavimento di coccio pesto e dalle pareti disadorne.

 

In fondo all'ambulacro orientale sorge una scaletta in muratura a1 (fig. 7, lettera e) con arco di sotto. Per essa si montava sopra alcune stanzette, esistenti sugli ambienti terreni 56 e 57, nei quali si entra da un piccolo vano a destra della scaletta.

 

Di questi ambienti, il primo (56) è una latrina, il secondo (57) una cucina.)

 

Le iscrizioni che quivi ritornarono a luce sono tutte graffite.

Sulla faccia orientale dello zoccolo rosso della seconda colonna a destra, nel lato orientale del portico, da sopra in sotto:

 

40.

40.

 

41.

41.

 

42.

42.

 

43. Busto virile a destra, parimente graffito, e sotto: (CIL IV 9005),

43. Busto virile a destra, parimente graffito, e sotto: (CIL IV 9005),

 

44.

44.

 

Sulla faccia rivolta a settentrione, in lettere minutissime:

 

45.

 Sulla faccia rivolta a settentrione, in lettere minutissime:

45.

 

Fra le terre tolte via dagli ambienti occupanti la estremità meridionale della casa si trovò un medio bronzo di Vespasiano, Cohen 155 (552, 6-XI 1-909).

 

Sul pavimento della camera posta all'angolo sud-est della casa lungo la parete meridionale, molti oggetti calcinati o fusi dal fuoco, e tra questi: calotta di bronzo, larga m. 0,17, che servì forse di rivestimento della estremità di una trave o di altro oggetto di legno, insieme coi frammenti di un imbuto, del pari di bronzo (553) ; bottiglia di vetro di forma quadrata, con ansa a nastro, contorta dal fuoco ; frammenti di alter bottiglie simili (554); ventisette monete di bronzo, tenute insieme dall'ossido e alterate dall'azione del fuoco (555).

 

Nell'ambulacro occidentale del peristilio si raccolse un asse repubblicano fuso, poco riconoscibile, Babelon op. cit. I, 50, n. 26 ? (683, 4-III-910).

 

Nella cucinetta, 57: orcio di terracotta, rustico, alto m. 0,26 (681); lucerna monolychne di terracotta ordinaria, lunga m. 0,08, con ansa ad anello, disposta trasversalmente all'asse della lucerna (682, 4-III-910).

 

Sul pavimento del cubicolo 52: vassoio rettangolare di ardesia (m. 0,34X0,215), decorato al di fuori dei lati brevi con due frontoncini a linea curva, terminanti con volute (691, 11-111-910) ; specchio circolare di bronzo, misurante m. 0,205 in diametro, privo di manico, ricoperto di ossido (692) ; altro specchio circolare di bronzo, largo m. 0,134, parimenti privo di manico (693); serratura di bronzo, di porta,con stanghetta (694); due robusti picconi di ferro, lunghi m. 0,30, tenuti uniti dall'ossido (695); falcetta di ferro, una volta con manico cilindrico di legno, lunga m. 0,25, e roncola pure di ferro, lunga m. 0,17, con la estremità piegata ad angolo retto, l'una e l'altra tenute insieme dall'ossido (696); zappa di ferro, larga m. 0,10 (697); boccetta di vetro a corpo quasi sferico e lungo collo, alta m. 0,065 (699); mascheretta muliebre con berretto frigio, alta m. 0,03, con avanzo di perno di ferro all'interno, col quale era tenuta aderente a qualche oggetto (700); due teste di chiodi, circolari, concave, larghe m. 0,04 (701); un dente di cinghiale (702); una Conchiglia (703); sei pezzi di catenella di bronzo a maglia e due anelletti (684, 7-III-1910).

 

Nella latrina, 57: borchia circolare di bronzo, larga m. 0,035 (Inv. 678, 1-III-1910)

 

Note: Ecco ciò che dice il Fiorelli della parte della descritta casa da lui vista (op. cit, pag. 435):

« 7. Seguono due pilastri laterizi, che costeggiano la porta di una casa, in cui notatisi residui di costruzioni molto antiche, e della quale si è scoperto l'atrio tuscanico, avente a sin. un cubicolo ed un ala, a dr. la cella dell'ostiario sottoposta ad una gradinata di legno, seguita da un apotheca e da un'altra ala, nella quale era forse il sacrario domestico. Di fronte sta il tablino, che a dr. ha un cubicolo e dall'altro canto un oecus, entrambi in comunicazione con località non ancora scavate ».

 

 

Fine del Notizie degli Scavi, 1910, p.454-461

 

 

 

 

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Ultimo aggiornamento - Last updated: 19-Mar-2022 15:25