PompeiiinPictures

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Casa di Sallustio or House of Sallust or Domus A. Cossius Libanus.

Excavated 1805 to 1809, 1969 to 1971, 2005 to 2007 and 2010.

Bombed 1943. Restored 1970.

 

Part 1      Part 2      Part 3      Part 4      Part 5      Part 6      Part 7      Part 8      Part 9      Plan

 

VI.2.4, Pompeii, on right. April 2019. Looking north on Via Consolare, between VI.17.26/5, on left and VI.2.2, on right.
The House of Sallust doorways can be seen on the right, numbered VI.2.3/4/5. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VI.2.4, Pompeii, on right. April 2019. Looking north on Via Consolare, between VI.17.26/5, on left and VI.2.2, on right.

The House of Sallust doorways can be seen on the right, numbered VI.2.3/4/5. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer. 

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii, in centre. January 2017. Looking east to entrance doorways, with VI.2.5, on left, and VI.2.3, on right.
Foto Annette Haug, ERC Grant 681269 DÉCOR.

VI.2.4 Pompeii, in centre. January 2017. Looking east to entrance doorways, with VI.2.5, on left, and VI.2.3, on right.

Foto Annette Haug, ERC Grant 681269 DÉCOR.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. May 2006. Entrance.
According to Breton, on either side of the entrance doorway were two pilasters surmounted with sculptured grey lava capitals. He could see one of them, which represented a Satyr teaching a young Faun to play the pipes. Today, all had disappeared. See Breton, Ernest. 1870. Pompeia, Guide de visite a Pompei, 3rd ed. Paris, Guerin. 

According to Della Corte, this house was originally attributed to Caius Sallustius, who was nominated for election in the inscription on the exterior house wall, no longer visible.
Originally the beautiful and noble house would have been in the hands of an old established Pompeian family, who must remain unknown. By 79AD, it was transformed into one of the biggest hospitiums or hotel in Pompeii. The owner was then more likely to be A. Cossius Libanus, a man possibly of oriental descent, whose bronze seal was found in the house in September 1806.  It read - A. Coss(ius) liban(us)  (S.33 or CIL X 8058,27) See Della Corte, M., 1965.  Case ed Abitanti di Pompei. Napoli: Fausto Fiorentino. (p.38)

According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de) the electoral recommendation read - 

C(aium) Sallustium       [CIL IV 104]

VI.2.4 Pompeii. May 2006. Entrance.

According to Breton, on either side of the entrance doorway were two pilasters surmounted with sculptured grey lava capitals.

He could see one of them, which represented a Satyr teaching a young Faun to play the pipes. Today, all had disappeared.

See Breton, Ernest. 1870. Pompeia, Guide de visite a Pompei, 3rd ed. Paris, Guerin.

 

According to Della Corte –

this house was originally attributed to Caius Sallustius, who was nominated for election in the inscription on the exterior house wall, no longer visible.

Originally the beautiful and noble house would have been in the hands of an old established Pompeian family, who must remain unknown.

By 79AD, it was transformed into one of the biggest hospitiums or hotels in Pompeii. 

The owner was then more likely to be A. Cossius Libanus, a man possibly of oriental descent, whose bronze seal was found in the house in September 1806.

 It read - A. Coss(ius) liban(us)  (S.33 or CIL X 8058,27)

See Della Corte, M., 1965. Case ed Abitanti di Pompei. Napoli: Fausto Fiorentino. (p.38)

 

According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de) the electoral recommendation read -

 

C(aium) Sallustium       [CIL IV 104]

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. April 2019. Looking east on Via Consolare towards entrance doorway.
Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. April 2019.

Looking east on Via Consolare towards entrance doorway. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. January 2017. Detail of facade on north side of entrance doorway.
Foto Annette Haug, ERC Grant 681269 DÉCOR.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. January 2017. Detail of facade on north side of entrance doorway.

Foto Annette Haug, ERC Grant 681269 DÉCOR.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. 1964. Looking through entrance doorway. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
J64f1821

VI.2.4 Pompeii. 1964. Looking through entrance doorway. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J64f1821

 

VI.2.4/5 Pompeii. Looking towards the bar at VI.2.5, with entrance doorway to VI.2.4, on right. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
J57f0399

VI.2.4/5 Pompeii. 1957.

Looking towards the bar at VI.2.5, with entrance doorway to VI.2.4, on right. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J57f0399

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. 1937-39. Looking towards the bar at VI.2.5, with entrance doorway to VI.2.4, on right. Photo courtesy of American Academy in Rome, Photographic Archive. 
Warsher collection no. 1394

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Pre-1937-39. Looking towards the bar at VI.2.5, with entrance doorway to VI.2.4, on right.

Photo courtesy of American Academy in Rome, Photographic Archive. Warsher collection no. 1394.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. From an album dated c.1875-1885. Looking towards the bar at VI.2.5, with entrance doorway to VI.2.4, on right.
Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. From an album dated c.1875-1885.

Looking towards the bar at VI.2.5, with entrance doorway to VI.2.4, on right. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Album by M. Amodio, c.1880, entitled “Pompei, destroyed on 23 November 79, discovered in 1748”.
Looking towards entrance doorway. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Album by M. Amodio, post 1873, entitled “Pompei, destroyed on 23 November 79, discovered in 1748”.

Looking towards entrance doorway. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Pre 1873 photograph by Amodio, no 2956. Looking towards entrance doorways. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Post-1873 photograph by Amodio, no 2956. Looking towards entrance doorways. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. About 1870. Entrance, in centre, with VI.2.5 on the left, and VI.2.3, on the right. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Post 1873. Entrance, in centre, with VI.2.5 on the left, and VI.2.3, on the right. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Old undated photograph of 1870s. Entrance looking into atrium. Courtesy of Society of Antiquaries. Fox Collection.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Old undated photograph of 1870s, post 1873. Entrance looking into atrium.

Courtesy of Society of Antiquaries. Fox Collection.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. From an album by Roberto Rive, dated 1868. 
Looking towards the bar at VI.2.5, with entrance doorway to VI.2.4, on right. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. From an album by Roberto Rive, dated 1868.

Looking towards the bar at VI.2.5, with entrance doorway to VI.2.4, on right. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. December 2007. Looking east into VI.2.5, and entrance to atrium.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. December 2007. Looking east into VI.2.5, and entrance to atrium.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Pre-1873, photograph Edizione Esposito, no. 045. Looking towards entrances, and into atrium. 
Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.
According to Laidlaw and others –
“A photograph of Michele Amodio of c.1873, shows the sculptured capital still in place (in photographs made only a few years later it had disappeared)”,(p.47)
“For the house of Sallust, Brogi, Amodio, Sommer, Anderson, Alinari and others sold a standard group of views, photographs of the façade, the atrium, the thermopolium next to it, the bakery, and the painting of Actaeon.” (p.45).
See Laidlaw, A., and Stella M. S., 2014. The House of Sallust in Pompeii (VI.2.4): JRA 98. Portsmouth Rhode Island. (p.45 and p.47)

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Pre-1873, photograph Edizione Esposito, no. 045. Looking towards entrances, and into atrium. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

According to Laidlaw and others –

“A photograph of Michele Amodio of c.1873, shows the sculptured capital still in place (in photographs made only a few years later it had disappeared)”, (p.47).

“For the house of Sallust, Brogi, Amodio, Sommer, Anderson, Alinari and others sold a standard group of views, photographs of the façade, the atrium, the thermopolium next to it, the bakery, and the painting of Actaeon.” (p.45).

See Laidlaw, A., and Stella M. S., 2014. The House of Sallust in Pompeii (VI.2.4): JRA 98. Portsmouth Rhode Island. (p.45 and p.47).

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. c.1819. Looking towards entrance doorway, on right, with figured capital on south side (right).
See Wilkins H, 1819. Suite de Vues Pittoresques des Ruines de Pompei. Rome, pl. XI.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. c.1819. Looking towards entrance doorway, on right, with figured capital on south side (right).

See Wilkins H, 1819. Suite de Vues Pittoresques des Ruines de Pompei. Rome, pl. XI.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. May 1823. Sketches of capitals, at the top, they are from the atrium near the entrance to the north ala.
The lower sketches show details of the capital on the south side of the entrance doorway.
See Chenavard, Antoine-Marie (1787-1883) et al. Voyage d'Italie, croquis Tome 3, pl. 143.
INHA Identifiant numérique : NUM MS 703 (3). See Book on INHA 
Document placé sous « Licence Ouverte / Open Licence » Etalab   

According to Laidlaw et al –
“The sculptured capital to the right of this entrance must have been discovered during this time (c.1776) and will have become a standard reference point for the excavators; the report for 18th May 1780 mentions the location of a group of finds “near the pier that corresponds to the one where the capital remains” when they were cleaning the street in front of it. From this report it is obvious that at the time of the Bourbon excavation the sculptured capital to the left of the main doorway at VI.2.4 no longer existed, although we know from other preserved examples that entrances of houses with tufa facades decorated with sculptured capitals were done in pairs, often with a Bacchic theme.” 
See Laidlaw, A., and Stella M. S., 2014. The House of Sallust in Pompeii (VI.2.4): JRA 98. Portsmouth Rhode Island. (p.23).

VI.2.4 Pompeii. May 1823. Sketches of capitals, at the top, they are from the atrium near the entrance to the north ala.

The lower sketches show details of the capital on the south side of the entrance doorway.

See Chenavard, Antoine-Marie (1787-1883) et al. Voyage d'Italie, croquis Tome 3, pl. 143.

INHA Identifiant numérique : NUM MS 703 (3). See Book on INHA

Document placé sous « Licence OuverteOpen Licence » Etalab   

 

According to Laidlaw et al –

“The sculptured capital to the right of this entrance must have been discovered during this time (c.1776) and will have become a standard reference point for the excavators; the report for 18th May 1780 mentions the location of a group of finds “near the pier that corresponds to the one where the capital remains” when they were cleaning the street in front of it. From this report it is obvious that at the time of the Bourbon excavation the sculptured capital to the left of the main doorway at VI.2.4 no longer existed, although we know from other preserved examples that entrances of houses with tufa facades decorated with sculptured capitals were done in pairs, often with a Bacchic theme.”

See Laidlaw, A., and Stella M. S., 2014. The House of Sallust in Pompeii (VI.2.4): JRA 98. Portsmouth Rhode Island. (p.23).

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. c.1817. Enlargement of sketch by Chenavard of capital from south side of entrance doorway.
See Chenavard, Antoine-Marie (1787-1883) et al. Voyage d'Italie, croquis Tome 3, pl. 143 (detail).
INHA Identifiant numérique : NUM MS 703 (3). See Book on INHA 
Document placé sous « Licence Ouverte / Open Licence » Etalab

VI.2.4 Pompeii. c.1817. Enlargement of sketch by Chenavard of capital from south side of entrance doorway.

See Chenavard, Antoine-Marie (1787-1883) et al. Voyage d'Italie, croquis Tome 3, pl. 143 (detail).

INHA Identifiant numérique : NUM MS 703 (3). See Book on INHA

Document placé sous « Licence OuverteOpen Licence » Etalab   

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Drawing c.1824 by Mazois of capital from south side of entrance doorway.
See Mazois, F., 1824. Les Ruines de Pompei : Second Partie. Paris: Firmin Didot, p.77, pl 36,2.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Drawing c.1824 by Mazois of capital from south side of entrance doorway.

See Mazois, F., 1824. Les Ruines de Pompei : Second Partie. Paris: Firmin Didot, p.77, pl 36,2.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. May 2010. Layout of house as shown in cork model in Naples Museum.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. May 2010. Layout of house as shown in cork model in Naples Museum.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. April 2019. Looking east across atrium and impluvium from entrance corridor.
Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. April 2019.

Looking east across atrium and impluvium from entrance corridor. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii, December 2017. Flooring in atrium/entrance corridor.
Foto Annette Haug, ERC Grant 681269 DÉCOR.

VI.2.4 Pompeii, December 2017. Flooring in atrium/entrance corridor.

Foto Annette Haug, ERC Grant 681269 DÉCOR.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. 1964. Looking east across atrium and impluvium from entrance corridor.
Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
J64f1822

VI.2.4 Pompeii. 1964. Looking east across atrium and impluvium from entrance corridor. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J64f1822

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. 1959. Looking east across north side of atrium, from entrance. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
J59f0575

VI.2.4 Pompeii. 1959. Looking east across north side of atrium, from entrance. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J59f0575

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. March 2019. Looking east across impluvium in atrium towards tablinum.
Foto Annette Haug, ERC Grant 681269 DÉCOR.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. March 2019. Looking east across impluvium in atrium towards tablinum.

Foto Annette Haug, ERC Grant 681269 DÉCOR.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii, December 2017. Looking east across impluvium in atrium. 
Foto Annette Haug, ERC Grant 681269 DÉCOR.

VI.2.4 Pompeii, December 2017. Looking east across impluvium in atrium.

Foto Annette Haug, ERC Grant 681269 DÉCOR.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. November 2014. Looking east across atrium and impluvium. Photo courtesy of Marie Schulze.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. November 2014. Looking east across atrium and impluvium. Photo courtesy of Marie Schulze.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. September 2004. Looking east across atrium and impluvium.
Apart from the west side, the house was entirely destroyed by the bombing during the night of 14/15th September 1943.  According to Laidlaw, the roof, the south apartment, and the portico behind the main house block are almost completely modern reconstructions made in 1970-71. See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p. 66-74)

VI.2.4 Pompeii. September 2004. Looking east across atrium and impluvium.

Apart from the west side, the house was entirely destroyed by the bombing during the night of 14/15th September 1943.

According to Laidlaw, the roof, the south apartment, and the portico behind the main house block are almost completely modern reconstructions made in 1970-71.

See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p. 66-74)

See Laidlaw, A., and Stella M. S., 2014. The House of Sallust in Pompeii (VI.2.4): JRA 98. Portsmouth Rhode Island.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii, 8th August 1976. Looking east across atrium and impluvium towards tablinum.
Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer, from Dr George Fay’s slides collection.

VI.2.4 Pompeii, 8th August 1976. Looking east across atrium and impluvium towards tablinum.

Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer, from Dr George Fay’s slides collection.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. 1968. Looking east across atrium and impluvium. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
J68f1922

VI.2.4 Pompeii. 1968. Looking east across atrium and impluvium. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J68f1922

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Hercules conquering the Stag of Cerinea, found on east side of impluvium. According to Anne Laidlaw, some of the major finds made during the first official excavation, in February of 1805 in front of Queen Maria Carolina, the Bourbon queen, were taken by her to Palermo when the French took over in March of 1806 under Napoleon, and now are in the Palermo Regional Archaeological Museum. The most striking was a large bronze fountain group of Hercules and the Stag, which was found at the back of the impluvium on a pedestal. All that you can see now in the impluvium margin are some sockets which either were for the waterworks or for the pedestal. 
Recent measurements of the pedestal and basin carried out for her in Palermo, were checked against the sockets in the impluvium margin in Sallust, and came out perfectly.
This would confirm the statue came from VI.2.4 and not Torre del Greco as shown on the museum card. Now in Palermo Regional Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8364 or 8634. According to Breton, on a base of marble in the centre of the impluvium, was found a bronze group representing Hercules conquering the stag, from the mouth of which flowed a jet of water. This group is now in the Museum of Palermo, and a copy in plaster in the Museum at Naples. See Breton, Ernest. 1870. Pompeia, Guide de visite a Pompei, 3rd ed. Paris, Guerin.  See Pagano, M. and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli.  Naples : Nicola Longobardi. (p.95, dated 5 Feb 1805). See Pagano, M., 1997. I Diari di Scavo di Pompeii, Ercolano e Stabiae di Francesco e Pietro la Vega (1764-1810.) Rome: L'Erma di Bretschneider. (p. 168). Photograph courtesy of Giovanni dall’Orto: Wikimedia creative commons.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Hercules conquering the Stag of Cerinea, found on east side of impluvium.

According to Anne Laidlaw, some of the major finds made during the first official excavation, in February of 1805 in front of Queen Maria Carolina, the Bourbon queen, were taken by her to Palermo when the French took over in March of 1806 under Napoleon, and now are in the Palermo Regional Archaeological Museum.

The most striking was a large bronze fountain group of Hercules and the Stag, which was found at the back of the impluvium on a pedestal.

All that you can see now in the impluvium margin are some sockets which either were for the waterworks or for the pedestal.

Recent measurements of the pedestal and basin carried out for her in Palermo, were checked against the sockets in the impluvium margin in Sallust, and came out perfectly.

This would confirm the statue came from VI.2.4 and not Torre del Greco as shown on the museum card.

Now in Palermo Regional Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8364 or 8634.

See Laidlaw, A., and Stella M. S., 2014. The House of Sallust in Pompeii (VI.2.4): JRA 98. Portsmouth Rhode Island.

According to Breton, on a base of marble in the centre of the impluvium, was found a bronze group representing Hercules conquering the stag, from the mouth of which flowed a jet of water.

This group is now in the Museum of Palermo, and a copy in plaster in the Museum at Naples.

See Breton, Ernest. 1870. Pompeia, Guide de visite a Pompei, 3rd ed. Paris, Guerin.

See Pagano, M. and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples: Nicola Longobardi. (p.95, dated 5 Feb 1805).

See Pagano, M., 1997. I Diari di Scavo di Pompeii, Ercolano e Stabiae di Francesco e Pietro la Vega (1764-1810.) Rome: L'Erma di Bretschneider. (p. 168).

Photograph courtesy of Giovanni dall’Orto: Wikimedia creative commons.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. May 2010. Looking west from rear of atrium across impluvium towards entrance, centre. The doorway to VI.2.3 is on the left of it, and to VI.2.5 is on the right of it. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. May 2010. Looking west from rear of atrium across impluvium towards entrance, centre.

The doorway to VI.2.3 is on the left of it, and to VI.2.5 is on the right of it. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. December 2017. Looking east along south side of atrium from near VI.2.3.
Foto Annette Haug, ERC Grant 681269 DÉCOR.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. December 2017. Looking east along south side of atrium from near VI.2.3.

Foto Annette Haug, ERC Grant 681269 DÉCOR.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. June 2010. Looking north towards counter of VI.2.5 taken from entrance corridor. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. June 2010. Looking north towards counter of VI.2.5, taken from entrance corridor. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Old undated photograph of 1870s. Rooms to north of atrium, looking east past VI.2.5 in foreground.
Courtesy of Society of Antiquaries. Fox Collection.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Old undated photograph of 1870s. Rooms to north of atrium, looking east past VI.2.5 in foreground.

Courtesy of Society of Antiquaries. Fox Collection.

 

 

Part 1      Part 2      Part 3      Part 4      Part 5      Part 6      Part 7      Part 8      Part 9      Plan

 

 

 

The low resolution pictures on this site are copyright © of Jackie and Bob Dunn and MAY NOT IN ANY CIRCUMSTANCES BE USED FOR GAIN OR REWARD COMMERCIALLY. On concession of the Ministero della Cultura - Parco Archeologico di Pompei. It is declared that no reproduction or duplication can be considered legitimate without the written authorization of the Parco Archeologico di Pompei.

Le immagini fotografiche a bassa risoluzione pubblicate su questo web site sono copyright © di Jackie e Bob Dunn E NON POSSONO ESSERE UTILIZZATE, IN ALCUNA CIRCOSTANZA, PER GUADAGNO O RICOMPENSA COMMERCIALMENTE. Su concessione del Ministero della Cultura - Parco Archeologico di Pompei. Si comunica che nessun riproduzione o duplicazione può considerarsi legittimo senza l'autorizzazione scritta del Parco Archeologico di Pompei.

Ultimo aggiornamento - Last updated: 01-Nov-2022 21:40