PompeiiinPictures

2. Gragnano, Petrellune (?). Villa discovered at the Ogliaro.

Excavated from January 4 to April 2, 1779.

Gragnano, Petrellune (?). La villa scoperta all’Ogliaro.

Scavato dal 4 gennaio al 2 aprile 1779.

 

Gragnano, Petrellune (?). La villa scoperta all’Ogliaro. Plan.
See Ruggiero M., 1881. Degli scavi di Stabia dal 1749 al 1782, Naples. Taf. X, fig. 1.

Gragnano, Petrellune (?). La villa scoperta all’Ogliaro. Plan.

See Ruggiero M., 1881. Degli scavi di Stabia dal 1749 al 1782, Naples. Taf. X, fig. 1.

 

English

Ruggiero 1881 (our approximate translation)

 

The missing Giornali of La Vega for the four villas drawn in Tables X (fig. "1"), XIV, XVII and XVIII, could not be more appropriately replaced than with the learned and precise illustrations published by Fiorelli in the appendix to the Dizionario alle antichità greche e romane del Rich (Firenze 1864-65), which I will use in its place; in which Fiorelli, writing as I believe about 1850, was able to draw his information from authentic documents, which then disappeared in the following years.

 

. ... The other villa was discovered in Oliaro from January 4 to April 2, 1779 and had the same peculiarity of being in the middle of the cultivated fields, on the slope of a hill in Gragnano (See Table X, fig. "1" The maps/papers of that time say that on the sides of the entrance a simple earthen floor roughly worked, i.e. grooves made with hoe, was discovered; that various of the bricks with which it was built carried the stamp, L. VISELLI, that was also read in other Herculaneum tiles; that the cells were arranged so as to remain all one next to the other, and with the openings under a porch that preceded them, supported by pillars; that the building was manifestly assigned to producing oil.

 

Neither has anyone noticed here a particularity that is encountered only in this villa, and which explains very clearly a rustic place that was not well understood. It consists of this, which left the torcularium, n.1, the oil cell, n.2, 3, the site where the family gathered, n.4, the horreum, n.5, 6, and arrive at trapetum, n.7, there was only one crusher (a) and almost in the centre of the same cell, a raised mound or round masonry base (b), 2 2/3 palms high, with part of the floor of the room enclosed between two small masonry ridges at right angles (c, d). This kind of tub with the bottom slightly inclined towards the lip (d) ended in a terracotta gutter, which from the front with little slope descended into a hollow, where the liquid collected by this channel, could easily be removed with the clay urn that was found standing on the top of the prominence in the site (d).

 

The Herculaneum academicians, who had this plan under their eyes, and who had not been able to determine which was the tank of olives in a villa (Delle Ant. Di Ercol. Tom. VIII, preface pag. XI, note 4), they did not notice that this sort of tank, in the trapetum cell, was supposed to be the reservoir, and that that masonry podium had served to hold some wooden tables, tabulatum, on which the olives were already laid. Cato speaks of it, in recommending that the oil is immediately pressed by the olives; si in terra et tabulato olea nimium diu erit, putescet, oleum foetidum fiet (cap. 3), and elsewhere olea ubi matura erit, quam primum cogi oportet, quam minimum fo terra et in tabulato esse oportet; in terra et in tabulato putescit, adding that factors want the olive in tabulato diu sit, ut fracida sit, quo facilius efficiant ( cap. 64);

and Varrone, who openly shows how in many villas this site stood outside the oil mill, does not speak of olives placed on the ground, but only de'tabulata, from which they removed in the same order as they had been placed. But Columella, who describes the tabulatum for a long time, without speaking of the olives left on the ground, makes us understand that that first and simple custum, of which we find this only example in the Stabian villas, was generally abandoned in its day, and replaced by the use de 'tabulata, which served as the tank to ripen the olives and collect their must and water, by canales aut fistulas (lib. XII, ch. 52); see also Pliny (Hist. lib. XV, ch. 6).

 

The following cells n.8, 9, which was accessed from the porch by three steps, belonged to the bathroom and contained the apodyterium dressing room, n.8, and a stove, laconicum, n.9, in which a masonry bath was located (g); its floor was of two foot square tiles (tegulae bipedales) resting on pillars of clay, in the manner indicated by Vitruvius (lib. V, chap. II, tom. 1, p. 307). I don't need to say why there were baths in the villas, it’s like that window that was seen open at noon,  (Geopon, lib. II, cap. 3, tom. 1, pag. 73) same in the rules of art, since this is read in all the ancient authors who dealt with this subject; I will note only how in the antecedent kitchen, n.10, with the earthen floor and white plaster, there were four steps (h) which gave onto the praefurnium, and not far away the mouth of the cistern (i), in which the water from the roof waters was collected, thanks to a large masonry channel on the outside wall (k). Farther on was the oven (l) and two other very rustic rooms, n.11, 12, which could be called ergastula (room to hold or punish slaves), and perhaps also one of them containing the saddle, n.13, ended this side the building, which seems to have had the length of 104 palms approximately.

 

To the right of the entrance, cubiculum n.14, with a separate exit on an area with broken brick pavement, n.15, supported by a small wall that divided it from the remaining cultivated land, n.16, can be seen as a dwelling of the villico, or the owner of the villa, who was certainly not a man of illustrious birth. Fiorelli (Op. Cit. Tom. II, pages 432-34).

 

See Ruggiero M., 1881. Degli scavi di Stabia dal 1749 al 1782, Naples. p. 325-6.

 

Centro di Cultura e Storia di Gragnano e Monti Lattari (our approximate translation)

 

Description of the 5 rustic Roman villas, discovered in the second part of the eighteenth century by Bourbon diggers, stripped of what was found and considered of some value and reinterred. Unfortunately, traces of their current location have been lost.

The first 3 descriptions are taken from Reich, Dictionary of Greek-Roman Antiquities, Appendix by Giuseppe Fiorelli. The text can be found at the Library of the Superintendent of Pompeii. 424 to 432; The other two are by Giuseppe Cosenza, Stabia, Trani 1907, p. 255.

 

Villa 1 – FIORELLI

 

The villa was discovered at the Ogliaro (note of the red.: Ogliaro is also the current name of an overhanging area on the left orographic of the Vernotic stream, rich in archaeological finds), from January 4 to April 2, 1779, and had the same peculiarity of being in the middle of the cultivated fields, on the slopes of a hill in Gragnano.

 

The maps of the time say that it was discovered with the hoe: that several of the bricks with which it was built carried the stamp "L. Vasilli", which was also read in other tiles of Herculaneum; that the other cells were all arranged in such a way as to remain next to each other, with the openings under a porch that preceded them, supported by pillars; that the building was manifestly responsible for the production of oil.

 

Nor have others noticed so far a particularity that is encountered only in this villa, and which explains very well a place not well understood of the rustics. It consists in this, that, left missing the torcularium, the oil cell, the site where the family gathered, then came the horreum, and arrived at the trapetum, there was only the crusher and, almost in the center of the same cell, a hillock or round masonry base, 2 2/3 palms high, with part of the floor of the room enclosed between two small raised masonry ridges at right angles. This kind of tub, with the bottom slightly inclined towards the lip, ended in a terracotta gutter, which from the front with a little slope descended into an inlet, where collected the liquid that had been conducted down this channel, and could easily be removed with a jar of clay, which was found standing on the summit of the prominence of the site.

 

The Herculaneum academics, who had this plan under their eyes, and who had not been able to determine what the reservoir of the olive trees in a villa was, did not see that this kind of basin, in the trapetum cella, had to be precisely the tank, and that that that masonry podium had served to hold a few wooden boards, tabulatum, on which were laid the already picked olives.

 

The following cells, which were accessed from the porch by three steps, belonged to the baths and contained the dressing room, the apodyterium, and a stove, laconicum, in which a masonry bath was located; its floor was of “tegulae bipedales” (2 feet square tiles), resting on the clay pillars, as indicated by Vitruvius (Lib. V Cap. II Tom I p 307). I will note that in the culina, with the earth floor with white plaster, were four steps that gave the praefurnium and, not far away, the mouth of the cistern, in which the water of the roof collected, thanks to a long factory channel on the outer wall of the Wall. In addition, the oven and other rooms, very rustic that could be called ergastola (slave quarters?), and perhaps even one of them containing the saddle, ended on this part of the building that seems to have had the length of palms 104 roughly.


To the right of the entrance was the cubiculum with a separate exit on an area paved with broken brick, supported by a small wall that divided it from the remaining cultivated land: it can be considered the dwelling of the villico or the owner of the villa that was certainly not a man of illustrious birth.

 

http://www.centroculturalegragnano.it/il-territorio-antico-di-gragnano-e-lager-stabianus/

 

Scavi archeologici di Stabia (our approximate translation)

 

Villa Petrellune is a rustic villa found in Petrellune, from which it also takes its name: the villa was explored in the least part during the Bourbon era, precisely in 1779, by Pietro la Vega. As already mentioned, the villa was partly explored and then abandoned when, after the removal of the floor, it was noted the presence of lapillo, which suggested the construction was after 79: in fact this hypothesis was wrong since it did not take into account the usual use that the Roman builders made, as a basis for the paving, of the lapilli coming from eruptions before that of 79. Several servile environments were explored such as torcularium, family cellae, the horreum, the trapetum with an olive mill and patronal environments such as calidarium with a praefurnium and a latrine. The floor mosaics and the parietal marbles found denoted the level of comfort of the owners, although it was a rustic villa: these were removed in 1779 and transferred to the palace of Portici: it was a white weave with some geometric designs in black.

 

See https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scavi_archeologici_di_Stabia

 

Italiano

Ruggiero 1881

 

Mancando i Giornali del la Vega per le quattro ville disegnate alle Tav. X (fig." 1"), XIV, XVII e XVIII, non si poteva più opportunamente supplirli che con le dotte e precise illustrazioni pubblicate dal Fiorelli in appendice al Dizionario alle antichità greche e romane del Rich (Firenze 1864-65), che andrò collocando ai luoghi loro; il qual Fiorelli, scrivendo come credo circa al 1850, potette trarre le sue notizie da documenti autentici, che poi disparvero negli anni seguenti.

 

. ... L'altra villa fu scoperta all'Oliaro dal 4 gennaio al 2 aprile1779 ed ebbe la medesima particolarità di stare in mezzo ai campi coltivali, sulla pendice di un colle a Gragnano (V. Tav. X, fig."1”). Le carte di quel tempo dicono che ai lati dell'ingresso si scoprì un semplice piano di terra lavorato a porche, cioè a solchi fatti con la zappa; che vari i dei mattoni con cui era costruita portavano il bollo, L. VISELLI, che si lesse pure in altri tegoli ercolanesi; che le celle stavano disposte in modo da rimaner tutte l'una appresso dell'altra, e con le aperture sotto di un portico che le precedeva, sorretto da pilastri; che l'edifizio era manifestamente addetto alla fattura dell'olio. altri ha fìn qui notata una particolarità che s'incontra solo in questa villa, e che spiega assai chiaramente un luogo non bene compreso dei rustici. Essa consiste in questo, che lasciato a manca il torcularium, n.1, la cella olearia, n.2, 3, il sito ove radunavasi la familia, n.4, l'horreum, n.5, 6, e giunti al trapetum, n.7, vi si trovava un solo infrantoio (a) e quasi nel centro della medesima cella, un poggio o base rotonda di fabbrica (b), alta palmi 2 2/3, con parte del pavimento della stanza rinchiusa tra due piccoli risalti di fabbrica ad angolo retto (c,d). Questa specie di vasca col fondo lievemente inclinato verso il labbro (d) metteva termine in una doccia di terracotta, che dalla parte di fronte con poco pendìo scendeva in un seno, ove raccolto il liquido che vi conduceva questo canaliculo, poteva togliersi agevolmente mercè di un urceolo di creta che fu trovato in piedi sul grosso del risalto nel sito (d).

 

Gli Accademici ercolanesi, ch'ebbero sotto gli occhi questa pianta, e che non erano riusciti a determinare quale fosse il serbatoio delle olive in una villa (Delle Ant. di Ercol. tom. VIII, prefaz. pag. XI, nota 4), non si avvidero che tale specie di vasca, nella cella del trapetum, dovea essere appunto il serbatoio, e che quel podio di fabbrica aveva servito per reggere qualche tavola di legno, tabulatum, sopra cui si deponevano le olive già colte. Ne parlano Catone, nel raccomandare che l'olio sia subito premuto dalle olive; si in terra et tabulato olea nimium diu erit, putescet, oleum foetidum fiet (cap. 3), ed altrove; olea ubi matura erit, quam primum cogi oportet, quam minimum fo terra et in tabulato esse oportet; in terra et in tabulato putescit, soggiungendo che i factores desiderano l'oliva in tabulato diu sit, ut fracida sit, quo facilius efficiant ( cap. 64); e Varrone che mostra apertamente come in molte ville questo sito stasse fuori del trappeto, non parla delle olive riposte in terra, ma solo de'tabulata, dai quali si toglievano nello stess'ordine com'erano state riposte. Ma Columella, che descrive lungamente il tabulatum, senza parlare delle olive rimaste in terra, ci fa comprendere che quel primo e semplice costume, di cui troviamo questo solo esempio nelle ville stabiane, fu a' suoi tempi generalmente dismesso, e sostituito dall' uso de' tabulata, che servivano come la vasca a maturare le olive e raccoglierne l'umore e l'acqua, per canales aut fistulas (lib. XII, cap. 52); veggasi anche Plinio (Hist. lib. XV, cap. 6).

 

Le celle seguenti n.8, 9, cui si accedeva dal portico per tre gradini, spettavano al bagno e contenevano lo spogliatoio apodyterium, n.8, ed una stufa, laconicum, n.9, in cui era situato un bagno di fabbrica (g); il suo pavimento era di tegulae bipedales poggianti sopra pilae di argilla, nel modo indicalo da Vitruvio (lib. V, cap. II, tom. 1, pag. 307). Non occorre che io dica perchè vi fossero i bagni nelle ville, e come quella finestra che si vedeva aperta a mezzogiorno,  (Geopon, lib. II, cap. 3, tom. 1, pag. 73) stesse nelle regole di arte, poichè ciò leggesi in tutti gli autori antichi che trattarono di questo argomento; noterò solo come nell'antecedente culina, n.10, col pavimento di terra ed intonaco bianco, eranvi quattro gradini (h) che davano al praefurnium, e poco discosto la bocca della cisterna (i), nella quale si raccoglievano le acque del tetto, mercè di un largo canale di fabbrica addosso alla parete esterna del muro (k). Inoltre il furnus (l) ed altre due stanze molto rustiche, n.11, 12, che potrebbero chiamarsi ergastola, e forse anche una di esse contenente la sella, n.13, terminava da questa parte l'edifizio, che sembra avesse avuto la lunghezza di palmi 104 all'incirca.

 

A destra dell'ingresso il cubicolo n.14, con uscita separata su di una area con lastrico di mattone infranto, n.15, sostenuta da un piccolo muro che la divideva dal rimanente terreno coltivato, n.16, può riputarsi l'abitazione del villico, ovvero del padrone della villa, che non fu certamente uomo d'illustri natali. Fiorelli (Op. cit. tom. II, pag. 432-34).

 

Vedi Ruggiero M., 1881. Degli scavi di Stabia dal 1749 al 1782, Naples. p. 325-6.

 

Centro di Cultura e Storia di Gragnano e Monti Lattari

 

Descrizione delle 5 Ville rustiche romane, scoperte nella seconda parte del Settecento dagli scavatori borbonici, spogliate di quanto rinvenuto e ritenuto di un qualche valore e reinterrate. Purtroppo si sono perse le tracce della loro attuale collocazione.

Le prime 3 descrizioni sono tratte da Reich, Dizionario delle antichità greche-romane, Appendice a cura di Giuseppe Fiorelli. Il testo è reperibile presso la Biblioteca della Soprintendenza di Pompei. Volume II, da pag. 424 a 432; le altre due sono di Giuseppe Cosenza, Stabia, Trani 1907, pag. 255.

 

I Villa – FIORELLI

La villa fu scoperta all’Ogliaro (nota del red.: Ogliaro è il nome anche attuale di un’area a strapiombo sulla sinistra orografica del torrente Vernotico, ricco di ritrovamenti archeologici), dal 4 gennaio al 2 aprile 1779, ed ebbe la medesima particolarità di stare in mezzo ai campi coltivati, sulle pendici di un colle a Gragnano.


Le carte del tempo dicono che si scoprì colla zappa: che vari dei mattoni con cui era costruita portavano il bollo “L. Vasilli”, che si lesse pure in altre tegole di Ercolano; che le altre celle stavano tutte disposte in modo da rimanere l’una appresso all’altra, con le aperture sotto un portico che le precedeva, sorretto da pilastri; che l’edificio era manifestamente addetto alla fattura dell’olio.


altri han fin qui notato una particolarità che s’incontra solo in questa villa, e che spiega assai bene un luogo non bene compreso dei rustici. Essa consiste in questo, che, lasciato a manca il torcularium, la cella olearia, il sito ove radunavasi la famiglia, veniva poi il l’horreum, e giunti al trapetum, vi si trovava solo l’infrantoio e, quasi al centro della medesima cella, un poggio o base rotonda di fabbrica, alta palmi 2 2/3, con parte del pavimento della stanza rinchiusa tra due piccoli risalti di fabbrica ad angolo retto. Questa specie di vasca, col fondo lievemente inclinato verso il labbro, metteva termine in una doccia di terracotta, che dalla parte di fronte con poco pendìo scendeva in un seno, ove raccolto il liquido che vi conduceva questo canalicolo, poteva togliersi agevolmente mercè un orciuolo di creta, che fu trovato in piedi sul grosso del risalto del sito.


Gli accademici ercolanesi, che ebbero sotto gli occhi questa pianta, e che non erano riusciti a determinare quale fosse il serbatoio delle ulive in una villa, non si avvidero che tale specie di vasca, nella cella del trapetum, doveva essere appunto il serbatoio, e che quel podio di fabbrica aveva servito per reggere qualche tavola di legno, tabulatum, sopra cui si disponevano le ulive già colte.


Le celle seguenti, cui si accedeva dal portico per tre gradini, spettavano al bagno e contenevano lo spogliatoio, l’apoditerium, ed una stufa, laconicum, in cui era situato un bagno di fabbrica; il suo pavimento era di tegulae hipedales, poggianti sopra il pilae di argilla, nel modo indicato da Vitruvio( Lib. V Cap. II Tom I pag 307). Noterò che nella culina, col pavimento di terra ad intonaco bianco, erano quattro gradini che davano al praefurnium e, poco discosto, la bocca della cisterna, nella quale di raccoglievano le acque del tetto, mercè un lungo canale di fabbrica addosso alla parete esterna del muro. Inoltre il furnus ed altre stanze, molto rustiche che potrebbero chiamarsi ergastola, e forse anche una di esse contenente la sella, terminava da questa parte dell’edificio che sembra avesse avuto la lunghezza di palmi 104 all’incirca.


A destra dell’ingresso era il cubicolo con una uscita separata su una area con lastrico di mattoni infranto, sostenuta da un piccolo muro che la divideva dal rimanente terreno coltivato: può reputarsi l’abitazione del villico ovvero del padrone della villa che non fu certamente uomo di illustri natali.

 

http://www.centroculturalegragnano.it/il-territorio-antico-di-gragnano-e-lager-stabianus/

 

Scavi archeologici di Stabia

 

Villa Petrellune è una villa rustica rinvenuta in località Petrellune, dal quale prende anche il nome: la villa fu esplorata in minima parte durante l'epoca borbonica, precisamente nel 1779, da Pietro la Vega. Come già accennato, la villa fu in piccola parte esplorata e poi abbandonata quando, dopo l'asportazione del pavimento, si notò la presenza di lapillo, che fece ritenere la costruzione fosse successiva al 79: in realtà questa ipotesi era sbagliata poiché non teneva conto dell'abituale uso che i costruttori romani facevano, come base per la pavimentazione, del lapillo proveniente da eruzioni precedenti a quella del 79. Furono esplorati diversi ambienti servili come il torcularium, le cellae destinate alla famiglia, l'horreum, il trapetum con un frantoio per le olive ed ambienti patronali come il calidarium con un praefurnium ed una latrina. I mosaici pavimentali e i marmi parietali rinvenuti denotavano il livello di agiatezza dei proprietari, nonostante si trattasse di una villa rustica: questi furono asportati nel 1779 e trasferiti alla reggia di Portici: si trattava di un tessellato bianco con alcuni disegni geometrici in nero.

 

See https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scavi_archeologici_di_Stabia

 

 

 

The low resolution pictures on this site are copyright © of Jackie and Bob Dunn and MAY NOT IN ANY CIRCUMSTANCES BE USED FOR GAIN OR REWARD COMMERCIALLY. On concession of the Ministero per i Beni e le Attività Culturali - Parco Archeologico di Pompei. It is declared that no reproduction or duplication can be considered legitimate without the written authorization of the Parco Archeologico di Pompei.

Le immagini fotografiche a bassa risoluzione pubblicate su questo web site sono copyright © di Jackie e Bob Dunn E NON POSSONO ESSERE UTILIZZATE, IN ALCUNA CIRCOSTANZA, PER GUADAGNO O RICOMPENSA COMMERCIALMENTE. Su concessione del Ministero per i Beni e le Attività Culturali - Parco Archeologico di Pompei. Si comunica che nessun riproduzione o duplicazione può considerarsi legittimo senza l'autorizzazione scritta del Parco Archeologico di Pompei.

Ultimo aggiornamento - Last updated: 06-Jan-2020 20:56