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IX.2.26 Pompeii. House of M. Casellius Marcellus.

Excavated 1869.

 

IX.2.26  Pompeii. March 2009. Entrance doorway in façade. The two coloured painted panels of the plaster can just about be seen.

IX.2.26  Pompeii. March 2009. Entrance doorway in façade.

The two coloured painted panels of the plaster can just about be seen.

 

IX.2.26  Pompeii. 1931. Exterior wall of façade, showing plaster painted in alternative panels of red and black.
DAIR 31.1073. Photo © Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Abteilung Rom, Arkiv. 
See http://arachne.uni-koeln.de/item/marbilderbestand/936466 
According to PPP, the panels might have been painted red and black, or perhaps red and yellow?
See Bragantini, de Vos, Badoni, 1986. Pitture e Pavimenti di Pompei, Parte 3. Rome: ICCD. (p.425)

IX.2.26  Pompeii. 1931. Exterior wall of façade, showing plaster painted in alternative panels of red and black.

DAIR 31.1073. Photo © Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Abteilung Rom, Arkiv.

See http://arachne.uni-koeln.de/item/marbilderbestand/936466

According to PPP, the panels might have been painted red and black, or perhaps red and yellow?

See Bragantini, de Vos, Badoni, 1986. Pitture e Pavimenti di Pompei, Parte 3. Rome: ICCD. (p.425)

 

IX.2.26 Pompeii. May 2005. Entrance doorway, looking south.
According to Trendelenberg, “The second entrance of the north vicolo gave entrance to a house (G. d. s. XIII p. 33 following), which was remarkable for the good conservation of the painted plaster of which the walls of both the external and the internal façade were coated with. In the beautiful white, yellow and black decoration, we could have seen cupids, birds, animals, griffins and other fantastic figures, but in this house we would seek in vain for mythological scenes. Among the figures which enlivened the walls, a dog merited special attention. It was painted in small proportions in the first panel of the entrance corridor on the left of where one entered the doorway. It was attached by means of a chain to a tree trunk, recalling the “cave canem” mosaic at the entrance of the House of the Tragic Poet. The entrance corridor was flanked on the right by the kitchen, on the left by the triclinium that opened entirely onto the atrium. The floor of it was of mattone pesto with a meandering stripe that ran around all four sides. In the centre was a square with a circle of white stones to mark the position of the table.
Near to the entrance corridor wall in the atrium, a red podium could be seen. On its principal face the altar and two serpents were painted, above this was the lararium in the form of an aedicula with roof, with two small supporting columns. On the opposite side and right alongside of the tablinum, there was a brick base, the surface of which was all covered with rust, leaving no doubt that this was the base for the iron box, in which the money was kept. In the floor of the second room on the left was a small coloured mosaic depicting two white doves and a closed box of yellow and red below them. In the garden was a narrow terrace, supported by four stuccoed columns, on which numerous inscribed graffiti were seen, published by Baron in G.d.s, XI, p.281, then in CIL IV, p.XVII, no.3297 and following. Today, the strokes of the letters are too deleted, and are best compared with the publication. Where, however, I managed to read a few words I found exactly as copied by Baron, except the beginning of the verse of the Aeneid, which is written just like this : CERTE HINC ROMANOS, etc."
See, Trendelenberg in BdI, 1871, p.179,

IX.2.26 Pompeii. May 2005. Entrance doorway, looking south.

According to Trendelenburg,

“The second entrance of the north vicolo gave entrance to a house (G. d. s. XIII p. 33 following), which was remarkable for the good conservation of the painted plaster of which the walls of both the external and the internal façade were coated with.

In the beautiful white, yellow and black decoration, we could have seen cupids, birds, animals, griffins and other fantastic figures, but in this house we would seek in vain for mythological scenes.

Among the figures which enlivened the walls, a dog merited special attention.

It was painted in small proportions in the first panel of the entrance corridor on the left of where one entered the doorway.

It was attached by means of a chain to a tree trunk, recalling the “cave canem” mosaic at the entrance of the House of the Tragic Poet.

 

The entrance corridor was flanked on the right by the kitchen, on the left by the triclinium that opened entirely onto the atrium.

The floor of it was of mattone pesto with a meandering stripe that ran around all four sides.

In the centre was a square with a circle of white stones to mark the position of the table.

 

Near to the entrance corridor wall in the atrium, a red podium could be seen.

On its principal face the altar and two serpents were painted, above this was the lararium in the form of an aedicula with roof, with two small supporting columns.

On the opposite side and right alongside of the tablinum, there was a brick base, the surface of which was all covered with rust, leaving no doubt that this was the base for the iron box, in which the money was kept.

 

In the floor of the second room on the left was a small coloured mosaic depicting two white doves and a closed box of yellow and red below them.

 

In the garden was a narrow terrace, supported by four stuccoed columns, on which numerous inscribed graffiti were seen, published by Baron in GdS, XI, p.281, then in CIL IV, p. XVII, no.3297 and following.

Today, the strokes of the letters are too deleted, and are best compared with the publication. Where, however, I managed to read a few words I found exactly as copied by Baron, except the beginning of the verse of the Aeneid, which is written just like this : CERTE HINC ROMANOS, etc.”

See, Trendelenburg in BdI, 1871, p.179.

 

IX.2.26 Pompeii. May 2005. Looking south through the tablinum to garden area.
According to Bragantini, the lava base for the arca, or moneychest, can be seen at the base of the pilaster, on the left. See Bragantini, de Vos, Badoni, 1986. Pitture e Pavimenti di Pompei, Parte 3. Rome: ICCD. (p.426, atrio ‘d’).
According to Fiorelli, a walkway preceded the large garden located behind the atrium, and on this walkway was a terrace with rooms, in which many men and women too refuge, whose rich jewellery, rings and pendants of gold, along with nine skeletons were found on the 18th and 20th November 1869. Of all graffiti, together with isolated names, that one could read on the pillars of this walkway, the most important was the one that contained the verse of the Aeneid (I.234):
CERTE . HINC . ROMANOS. OLIM
VOLENTIBVS ANNIIIS
See Pappalardo, U., 2001. La Descrizione di Pompei per Giuseppe Fiorelli (1875). Napoli: Massa Editore, (p.144).

IX.2.26 Pompeii. May 2005. Looking south through the tablinum to garden area.

According to Bragantini, the lava base for the arca, or money chest, can be seen at the base of the pilaster, on the left.

See Bragantini, de Vos, Badoni, 1986. Pitture e Pavimenti di Pompei, Parte 3. Rome: ICCD. (p.426, atrio ‘d’).

According to Fiorelli, a walkway preceded the large garden located behind the atrium, and on this walkway was a terrace with rooms, in which many men and women took refuge, whose rich jewellery, rings and pendants of gold, along with their nine skeletons were found on the 18th and 20th November 1869.

Of all graffiti, together with isolated names, that one could read on the pillars of this walkway, the most important was the one that contained the verse of the Aeneid (I.234):

CERTE . HINC . ROMANOS. OLIM

VOLENTIBVS ANNIIIS

See Pappalardo, U., 2001. La Descrizione di Pompei per Giuseppe Fiorelli (1875). Napoli: Massa Editore, (p.144).

 

IX.2.26 Pompeii. 1932. Lava base for the arca, or money chest in the tablinum.
DAIR 1932.1111. Photo © Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Abteilung Rom, Arkiv. 
See http://arachne.uni-koeln.de/item/marbilderbestand/936467

IX.2.26 Pompeii. 1932. Lava base for the arca, or money chest in the tablinum.

DAIR 32.1111. Photo © Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Abteilung Rom, Arkiv.

See http://arachne.uni-koeln.de/item/marbilderbestand/936467

 

IX.2.26 Pompeii. 1966. Looking north from garden at rear,  towards atrium with lararium, on left. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
J66f1006

IX.2.26 Pompeii. 1966. Looking north from garden at rear, towards atrium with lararium, on left.

Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J66f1006

 

IX.2.26 Pompeii. 1966. Looking north-east across garden areas. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
J66f1007

IX.2.26 Pompeii. 1966. Looking north-east across garden areas. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J66f1007

 

231911 Bestand-D-DAI-ROM-W.1639.jpg
IX.2.26 Pompeii. W.1639. Looking north to lararium in atrium, and triclinium on its east side.
On the left is the entrance corridor.
Photo by Tatiana Warscher. Photo © Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Abteilung Rom, Arkiv. See http://arachne.uni-koeln.de/item/marbilderbestand/231911

IX.2.26 Pompeii. W.1639. Looking north to lararium in atrium, and triclinium on its east side.

On the left is the entrance corridor.

Photo by Tatiana Warscher. Photo © Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Abteilung Rom, Arkiv.

See http://arachne.uni-koeln.de/item/marbilderbestand/231911  

 

IX.2.26 Pompeii. Lararium situated at south end of east wall of corridor leading to atrium.  
Old undated photograph from Fox collection. Courtesy of Society of Antiquaries. According to Bragantini, the triclinium on the east side of the lararium had a floor of cocciopesto, ornamented with a design in white tesserae. It had a border and in the centre had a circle of white tesserae that was the site of the table.  The north wall had a small window. The walls were painted with a black dado decorated with painted plants. The middle zone of the walls was white, with panels edged with a border separated by narrow compartments with candelabra. The upper zone was probably white, with architectural paintings.
See Bragantini, de Vos, Badoni, 1986. Pitture e Pavimenti di Pompei, Parte 3. Rome: ICCD. (p.425, triclinio ‘c’).

IX.2.26 Pompeii. Lararium situated at south end of east wall of corridor leading to atrium. 

Old undated photograph from Fox collection. Courtesy of Society of Antiquaries.

According to Bragantini, the triclinium on the east side of the lararium had a floor of cocciopesto, ornamented with a design in white tesserae.

It had a border and in the centre had a circle of white tesserae that was the site of the table.

The north wall had a small window.

The walls were painted with a black dado decorated with painted plants.

The middle zone of the walls was white, with panels edged with a border separated by narrow compartments with candelabra.

The upper zone was probably white, with architectural paintings.

See Bragantini, de Vos, Badoni, 1986. Pitture e Pavimenti di Pompei, Parte 3. Rome: ICCD. (p.425, triclinio ‘c’).

 

IX.2.26  Pompeii.  March 2009.  Lararium in atrium, on east side of corridor from entrance.

IX.2.26 Pompeii. March 2009. 

Lararium in atrium, on east side of corridor from entrance.

 

IX.2.26  Pompeii.  March 2009.  Remains of Lararium.

IX.2.26 Pompeii. March 2009. Remains of Lararium.

According to Boyce, the high podium was coated with red stucco and on the front was painted a cylindrical altar with offerings.

Two yellowish serpents coiled around the altar, raising their heads to the offerings, one from each side.

Around the top of the podium ran a heavy cornice adorned with a red frieze of stucco, above it two columns.

These columns with capitals and bases supported an architrave with a design of scallops and a cornice with triple band, all done in coloured stucco.

The back wall was decorated with shrubs and birds painted on a yellow background, the side walls were painted as red and yellow imitation marble.

On the exterior of each side wall were a hippogriff (a mythical beast half griffin and half horse) and two dolphins.

See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14. (p. 82, Pl. 34, 3.)

 

IX.2.26  Pompeii.  March 2009.  South side (front) of Lararium.

IX.2.26  Pompeii. March 2009. South side (front) of Lararium.

 

IX.2.26  Pompeii.  March 2009.  Front of Lararium.  A painted alter is just about visible in the centre but the 2 snakes creeping towards it are faded.

IX.2.26  Pompeii. March 2009. Front of Lararium. 

A painted altar is just about visible in the centre but the 2 serpents creeping towards it are faded.

 

IX.2.26  Pompeii.  March 2009.  West side of base of Lararium.

IX.2.26  Pompeii. March 2009. West side of base of Lararium.