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VIII.2.28 Pompeii. Casa del Ninfeo or House with Nymphaeum.

Excavated 1758?, 1886, 1928.

Part 1                                         Part 2

 

Part 3

 

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. December 2005. Via della Regina looking west.         VIII.3 on right.

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. December 2005. Via della Regina looking west.            VIII.3 on right.

 

VIII.2.28 Pompeii, on left. 1968. Looking west along south side of Via della Regina, to doorways of VIII.2.28, 27 and 26. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
J68f1066

VIII.2.28 Pompeii, on left. 1968.

Looking west along south side of Via della Regina, to doorways of VIII.2.28, 27 and 26.

Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J68f1066

 

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. December 2005. Entrance doorway. On the left (east) is a doorway leading to the anteroom of the kitchen, and to the kitchen and latrine. The kitchen and latrine are to the east of the anteroom. The kitchen had a hearth built against the east wall, and the latrine with a small window was in the north-east corner.

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. December 2005. Entrance doorway.

On the left (east) is a doorway leading to the anteroom of the kitchen, and to the kitchen and latrine.

The kitchen and latrine are to the east of the anteroom.

The kitchen had a hearth built against the east wall, and the latrine with a small window was in the north-east corner.

 

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. December 2005. Entrance fauces or corridor, looking south.

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. December 2005. Entrance fauces or corridor, looking south.

 

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. September 2005. Looking south towards entrance and atrium, at its rear is the tablinum, and the remains of the terrace. Taken from Casa della Regina Carolina.

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. September 2005.

Looking south towards entrance and atrium, at its rear is the tablinum, and the remains of the terrace.

Taken from Casa della Regina Carolina.

 

VIII.2.28 Pompeii and VIII.2.29. September 2005. Looking south-east from Casa della Regina Carolina.

VIII.2.28 Pompeii and VIII.2.29. September 2005. Looking south-east from Casa della Regina Carolina.

 

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. September 2005. Looking north across atrium from tablinum, towards entrance.

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. September 2005. Looking north across tetrastyle atrium from tablinum, towards entrance, in centre.

According to Richardson, the room in the north-west corner of the atrium (west of the entrance corridor) may have been a triclinium.

Between the triclinium and a storeroom next to it, the lararium was built.

See Richardson, L., 1988. Pompeii: an Architectural History. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press. (p.231-2).

 

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. Looking north across tablinum across atrium towards entrance.
Photographed 1970-79 by Günther Einhorn, picture courtesy of his son Ralf Einhorn.
According to Richardson, the tablinum was open on both its north and south sides.
On the atrium end, the sill preserved cuttings for some sort of closure, perhaps a folding screen. In both its west and east wall it had doorways at its south end, the west doorway leading to a large exedra, which was also open across its whole south side to the view.
On the east side of the tablinum was a corridor, the doorway in the east wall led into this corridor. From the corridor was a doorway to a small cubiculum, and a small exedra also facing south across the terrace. Beyond these rooms stretched a broad flat terrace that must have been finished with a parapet, no trace of which survives.
See Richardson, L., 1988. Pompeii: an Architectural History. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press. (p.231-2).

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. Looking north across tablinum across atrium towards entrance.

Photographed 1970-79 by Günther Einhorn, picture courtesy of his son Ralf Einhorn.

According to Richardson, the tablinum was open on both its north and south sides.

On the atrium end, the sill preserved cuttings for some sort of closure, perhaps a folding screen.

In both its west and east wall it had doorways at its south end, the west doorway leading to a large exedra, which was also open across its whole south side to the view.

On the east side of the tablinum was a corridor, the doorway in the east wall led into this corridor.

From the corridor was a doorway to a small cubiculum, and a small exedra also facing south across the terrace.

Beyond these rooms stretched a broad flat terrace that must have been finished with a parapet, no trace of which survives.

See Richardson, L., 1988. Pompeii: an Architectural History. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press. (p.231-2).

 

VIII.2.28 Pompeii.  September 2005.  Looking north east across atrium.

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. September 2005. Looking north-east across tetrastyle atrium.

 

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. September 2005. Rooms on east side of atrium, cubiculum, east ala and another cubiculum. According to Richardson, in tetrastyle atria the alae are located in the centre of each side, and here they were originally framed with pilasters.
See Richardson, L., 1988. Pompeii: an Architectural History. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press. (p.231-2).

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. September 2005. Rooms on east side of atrium, cubiculum, east ala and another cubiculum.

According to Richardson, in tetrastyle atria the alae are located in the centre of each side, and here they were originally framed with pilasters.

See Richardson, L., 1988. Pompeii: an Architectural History. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press. (p.231-2).

 

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. September 2011. Looking east across atrium.

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. September 2011. Looking east across atrium.

 

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. September 2005. Rooms on west side of atrium. According to Richardson, the rooms on the west side of the atrium were much shallower than those on the east.
The small rooms on either side of the central ala may have been storerooms.
See Richardson, L., 1988. Pompeii: an Architectural History. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press. (p.231-2).

In the north-west corner of the atrium is a masonry base, just visible to the left of the column. This was the lararium. The top of it had three small steps of marble (see below). 
The aedicula that was originally on the base has disappeared. On the north wall above the base, when excavated, the figures of the Lares could still be seen.
See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14. (p74, no.345)

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. September 2005. Rooms on west side of atrium.

According to Richardson, the rooms on the west side of the atrium were much shallower than those on the east.

The small rooms on either side of the central ala may have been storerooms.

See Richardson, L., 1988. Pompeii: an Architectural History. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press. (p.231-2).

 

In the north-west corner of the atrium is a masonry base, just visible to the left of the column.

This was the lararium. The top of it had three small steps of marble (see below).

The aedicula that was originally on the base has disappeared.

On the north wall above the base, when excavated, the figures of the Lares could still be seen.

See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14. (p74, no.345)

 

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. September 2011. Base of Lararium.

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. September 2011. Base of Lararium.

 

VIII.2.28 Pompeii.  Three small grey marble steps on top of Lararium base.
Photographed 1970-79 by Günther Einhorn, picture courtesy of his son Ralf Einhorn.

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. Three small grey marble steps on top of lararium base.

Photographed 1970-79 by Günther Einhorn, picture courtesy of his son Ralf Einhorn.

 

VIII.2.28 Pompeii.  September 2005.  Looking north across impluvium and columns.

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. September 2005. Looking north across impluvium and columns in atrium.

 

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. Found on 28th June 1758. 
Wall painting of a counting frame on a pile of coins, an inscribed open diptych, a cask with fruit and a bag which may contain coins.
The open diptych contains CIL IV 1174.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 4675.
See Pagano, M. and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples : Nicola Longobardi. 
(p.27 where the last line of CIL IV 1174 is given as “actu cara”)  PAH I, 1, 77.
See Helbig, W., 1868. Wandgemälde der vom Vesuv verschütteten Städte Campaniens. Leipzig: Breitkopf und Härtel. (1725).
See Varone, A. and Stefani, G., 2009. Titulorum Pictorum Pompeianorum, Rome: L’erma di Bretschneider, (p.365)

According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de), CIL IV 1174 reads

Septimea
Acci caese
Marcella
Amaranti
actu(m) Pom(peis)       [CIL IV 1174]

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. Found on 28th June 1758.

Wall painting of a counting frame on a pile of coins, an inscribed open diptych, a cask with fruit and a bag which may contain coins.

The open diptych contains CIL IV 1174.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 4675.

See Pagano, M. and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples : Nicola Longobardi.

(p.27 where the last line of CIL IV 1174 is given as “actu cara”)  PAH I, 1, 77.

See Helbig, W., 1868. Wandgemälde der vom Vesuv verschütteten Städte Campaniens. Leipzig: Breitkopf und Härtel. (1725).

See Varone, A. and Stefani, G., 2009. Titulorum Pictorum Pompeianorum, Rome: L’erma di Bretschneider, (p.365)

 

According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de), CIL IV 1174 reads

 

Septimea

Acci caese

Marcella

Amaranti

actu(m) Pom(peis)       [CIL IV 1174]

 

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. Found on 28th June 1758. Wall painting of a small piece of architecture, two books, two ink stands and a pen, and a semi open scroll with many words visible. The scroll contained a poem found in several places in Pompeii. See CIL IV 1173. Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 4676. See Pagano, M. and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples : Nicola Longobardi. (p.27)  PAH I, 1, 77.
See Varone, A., 2002. Erotica Pompeiana: Love Inscriptions on the Walls of Pompeii, Rome: L’erma di Bretschneider. (p.62-3).
See Helbig, W., 1868. Wandgemälde der vom Vesuv verschütteten Städte Campaniens. Leipzig: Breitkopf und Härtel. (1724).

According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de), CIL IV 1173 reads

Quisquis
ama(t) valia(t)
peria(t) qui nescit ama[re]
bis tanti
periapt
quisqu
is amare
vota(t)
felices
adias maneas
o Martia
si te vidi
dum nobis
maxima
cura placet       [CIL IV 1173]

VIII.2.28 Pompeii. Found on 28th June 1758.

Wall painting of a small piece of architecture, two books, two ink stands and a pen, and a semi open scroll with many words visible.

The scroll contained a poem found in several places in Pompeii. See CIL IV 1173.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 4676.

See Pagano, M. and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples : Nicola Longobardi. (p.27) 

PAH I, 1, 77.

See Varone, A., 2002. Erotica Pompeiana: Love Inscriptions on the Walls of Pompeii, Rome: L’erma di Bretschneider. (p.62-3).

See Helbig, W., 1868. Wandgemälde der vom Vesuv verschütteten Städte Campaniens. Leipzig: Breitkopf und Härtel. (1724).

 

According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de), CIL IV 1173 reads

 

Quisquis

ama(t) valia(t)

peria(t) qui nescit ama[re]

bis tanti

periapt

quisqu

is amare

vota(t)

felices

adias maneas

o Martia

si te vidi

dum nobis

maxima

cura placet       [CIL IV 1173]

 

 

Part 2

 

Part 3