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VII.7.32 Pompeii. Tempio di Apollo or Temple of Apollo.

Excavated 1817.

Part 1.                             Part 2

Part 3            Part 4            Part 5

 

The Temple had previously been named individually for Bacco - Bacchus, Venere - Venus, Ceres or Mercurio – Mercury (also with Maia) until finally identified as that of Apollo.

See Van der Poel, H. B., 1983. Corpus Topographicum Pompeianum, Part II. Austin: University of Texas, pp. 284-5.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. December 2005. Entrance doorway on Via Marina. 
According to Cooke Cockburn and Donaldson: “However splendid in their general arrangements, the columns of the peribolus are capricious in taste and decoration. The capitals are of stucco, of the Corinthian order, with a single row of leaves covering a capital originally Doric; the entablature is of tufo, once Doric, but converted to accord with the capital by a thick coat of plaster, in a grotesque style and painted. The walls of the court are covered with paintings of the most interesting description. They are in vivid colours and represent generally landscapes, views of country houses, interiors of rooms with male and female figures; in several compositions figures are drawn sporting among themselves, sacrificing to Priapus, contending with crocodiles, or occupied in domestic duties; nor must we omit a painting of Hector tied to the car of Achilles, and one of Agamemnon and Achilles. The sanctuary itself now presents only its four dark walls, raised on an elevated and dismantled basement, in former times enriched with marbles; the portico completely surrounded the cella, having six columns in front, and in all probability eleven on the flanks, agreeing in this respect with the rules of Vitruvius.
Withinside is the rough construction for the altar, and the pavement is a very elegant mosaic, the centre compartment consisting of green, white and black marbles, and the border of a Greek meander of black, white and red mosaic.  The walls, as well as the steps, retain every appearance of the fatal effects of the earthquake, being shattered, out of level, and displaced. At the end of the court, opposite the entrance, is a small chamber, which possesses an invaluable picture of Bacchus and Silenus, the former holding the thyrsus in one hand and a vase in the other; Silenus appears with his lyre instructing the god. A small niche is in the wall, apparently for the reception of a statue or lares.”
See Cooke Cockburn Donaldson: Pompeii, Pt 1, 1827, (p.55)

VII.7.32 Pompeii. December 2005. Entrance doorway on Via Marina.

According to Cooke Cockburn and Donaldson:

“However splendid in their general arrangements, the columns of the peribolus (precinct) are capricious in taste and decoration.

The capitals are of stucco, of the Corinthian order, with a single row of leaves covering a capital originally Doric; the entablature is of tufo, once Doric, but converted to accord with the capital by a thick coat of plaster, in a grotesque style and painted.

The walls of the court are covered with paintings of the most interesting description.

They are in vivid colours and represent generally landscapes, views of country houses, interiors of rooms with male and female figures; in several compositions figures are drawn sporting among themselves, sacrificing to Priapus, contending with crocodiles, or occupied in domestic duties; nor must we omit a painting of Hector tied to the car of Achilles, and one of Agamemnon and Achilles.

The sanctuary itself now presents only its four dark walls, raised on an elevated and dismantled basement, in former times enriched with marbles; the portico completely surrounded the cella, having six columns in front, and in all probability eleven on the flanks, agreeing in this respect with the rules of Vitruvius.

Withinside is the rough construction for the altar, and the pavement is a very elegant mosaic, the centre compartment consisting of green, white and black marbles, and the border of a Greek meander of black, white and red mosaic.

The walls, as well as the steps, retain every appearance of the fatal effects of the earthquake, being shattered, out of level, and displaced.

At the end of the court, opposite the entrance, is a small chamber, which possesses an invaluable picture of Bacchus and Silenus, the former holding the thyrsus in one hand and a vase in the other; Silenus appears with his lyre instructing the god. A small niche is in the wall, apparently for the reception of a statue or lares.”

See Cooke Cockburn Donaldson: Pompeii, Pt 1, 1827, (p.55)

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. 1825 drawing of the painting of Bacchus and Silenus. Small room at the rear of the temple. Bacchus was holding the thyrsus in one hand and an upended cup in the other, with the panther below. Silenus was playing his lyre for the god, with a basket of fruit by his feet.  See Real Museo Borbonico II, 1825, pl. 35.
According to Garcia y Garcia, this painting is now held at the Naples Museum, inventory number 9269. See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p.112)

VII.7.32 Pompeii. 1825 drawing of the painting of Bacchus and Silenus. Small room at the rear of the temple.

Bacchus was holding the thyrsus in one hand and an upended cup in the other, with the panther below.

Silenus was playing his lyre for the god, with a basket of fruit by his feet.

See Real Museo Borbonico II, 1825, pl. 35.

According to Garcia y Garcia, this painting is now held at the Naples Museum, inventory number 9269.

See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p.112)

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii.  1834 painting of the wall of the small room with the painting of Bacchus and Silenus. Bacchus was holding the thyrsus in one hand and an upended cup in the other; Silenus was playing his lyre for the god. Mazois could not understand why the artist had drawn a Billy goat rather than the panther seen in the original. See Mazois, F., 1838. Les Ruines de Pompei: Quatrieme Partie. Paris: Didot Freres, p. 39, note (1), pl. XLII.

VII.7.32 Pompeii.  1834 painting of the wall of the small room with the painting of Bacchus and Silenus.

Bacchus was holding the thyrsus in one hand and an upended cup in the other; Silenus was playing his lyre for the god.

Mazois could not understand why the artist had drawn a Billy goat rather than the panther seen in the original.

See Mazois, F., 1838. Les Ruines de Pompei : Quatrième Partie. Paris: Didot Freres, p. 39, note (1), pl. XLII.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii.  March 2009.  East wall at side of entrance doorway on Via Marina.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. March 2009. East wall at side of entrance doorway on Via Marina.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. March 2009. Remains of plaster on east wall at side of entrance doorway.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. March 2009. Remains of plaster on east wall at side of entrance doorway.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii.  March 2009.  East wall at side of entrance. Remains of plaster.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. March 2009. Remains of plaster on east wall at side of entrance doorway.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. March 2009. White insert in road surface in Via Marina, outside Temple entrance.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. March 2009.

White insert in road surface in Via Marina, outside Temple entrance.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. September 2015. Looking north through locked entrance gate.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. September 2015. Looking north through locked entrance gate.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. September 2015. Looking towards a well-trodden path across the temple, on the east side of the south end.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. September 2015.

Looking towards a well-trodden path across the temple, on the east side of the south end.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. September 2015. Looking towards a well-trodden path across the temple, on the west side of the south end.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. September 2015.

Looking towards a well-trodden path across the temple, on the west side of the south end.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. December 2005. Looking north from entrance.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. December 2005. Looking north from entrance doorway.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. c 1879 photograph Tauchnitz 033 [photo Sommer 185]. Looking north. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. c 1879 photograph Tauchnitz 033 [photo Sommer 185]. Looking north.

Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. pre 1873 photograph by Amodio, no 2966. Looking north. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. pre 1873 photograph by Amodio, no 2966. Looking north.

Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. Between 1867 and 1874. Sommer and Behles stereoview. Looking north from entrance doorway.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. Between 1867 and 1874. Sommer and Behles stereoview.

Looking north from entrance doorway.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. Undated 19th Century photograph. Looking north from entrance doorway. Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. Undated 19th Century photograph. Looking north from entrance doorway.

Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. May 2010. Looking north towards altar and podium. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. May 2010.

Looking north towards altar and podium. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. Old photograph. Looking north towards altar and podium. 
Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. Old photograph. Looking north towards altar and podium.

Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. May 2010. Altar and Temple podium. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. May 2010. Altar and Temple podium. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. Late 19th century photo by Mauri, no 003. Altar and Temple podium. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. Late 19th century photo by Mauri, no 003. Altar and Temple podium.

Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. 4th April 1980, pre earthquake. Looking north towards altar and steps to podium.  Photo courtesy of Tina Gilbert.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. 4th April 1980, pre earthquake.

Looking north towards altar and steps to podium.

Photo courtesy of Tina Gilbert.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. 1944. Looking north across altar towards temple podium. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. 1944. Looking north across altar towards temple podium.

Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. May 1923. Looking north to steps to podium. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. May 1923. Looking north to steps to podium. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii.  December 2005. Looking north east towards Altar, Podium and Cella. The statue of  Artemis is in front of the third column on the west side.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. December 2005. Looking north-east towards altar, podium and cella.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. 1905. Looking north-east towards steps. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. 1905. Looking north-east towards steps. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VII.7.32  Pompeii. Temple of Apollo.   Old undated photograph.
Courtesy of the Society of Antiquaries, Fox Collection.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. Temple of Apollo. Old undated photograph.

Courtesy of the Society of Antiquaries, Fox Collection.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. 1875. Looking north-east acrossTemple towards altar and podium. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. 1875. Looking north-east across Temple towards altar and podium.

Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VII.7.32 Pompeii. Undated photograph. Looking north-east towards podium of Temple. Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

VII.7.32 Pompeii. Undated 19th C. photograph. Looking north-east towards podium of Temple.

Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

 

Part 2

Part 3            Part 4            Part 5