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VI.11.8 Pompeii. Casa di Eutychus.

Linked to VI.11.9 and VI.11.10. Excavated 1835, 1843. Bombed in 1943.

 

VI.11.8 / 9 / 10 Plan (opens in separate window)

 

VI.11.8 Pompeii. September 2005. Entrance doorway. According to Garcia y Garcia, this beautiful house, that had preserved the remains of some of its upper floor which had been restored after excavation, was badly hit in 1943. The night bombardment of 16th September 1943 destroyed the rooms on the south side of the atrium, and all the remains of the upper floor. It was then again left derelict and ruined.
The entrance doorway was then bricked in and it was only accessible through two openings made in modern times. One through the bakery of House of the Labyrinth, the other through part of the falling down western wall, south of the authentic entrance number 8. See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p.82)
According to Della Corte, an electoral recommendation was found here at this doorway, reading – Eutychi    [CIL IV 1369].
He hypothesised that Eutychi may have been the faithful servant/procurator, who stayed too long before fleeing from the eruption.  A skeleton was found in the lapilli, high up above the peristyle of VI.11.9/10, with a group of precious objects together with a key and seal registered to him and with the letters – Eutychi.  See Della Corte, M., 1965.  Case ed Abitanti di Pompei. Napoli: Fausto Fiorentino. (p.44)
According to G. Luongo et al, the skeleton found above the peristyle was a woman. See Luongo, G. et al. (2003): Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research126, (p.195)
According to Pagano and Prisciandaro, found in March 1835 in the middle of the peristyle but above the original soil level, was a skeleton.
Nearby were two gold circles, perhaps armbands or bracelets, (MN 24992 and 24993); three gold rings and an iron key, together with a bronze seal with an inscription –
Euti
chi     [CIL X 8058,33]
These objects are now in Naples Archaeological Museum, inventory numbers – MN 4755, 25830, 25831, 25832. See Pagano, M. and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples : Nicola Longobardi. 
(p.150) PAH, II, 304-5.

VI.11.8 Pompeii. September 2005. Entrance doorway.

According to Garcia y Garcia, this beautiful house, that had preserved the remains of some of its upper floor which had been restored after excavation, was badly hit in 1943.

The night bombardment of 16th September 1943 destroyed the rooms on the south side of the atrium, and all the remains of the upper floor.

It was then again left derelict and ruined.

The entrance doorway was then bricked in and it was only accessible through two openings made in modern times.

One through the bakery of House of the Labyrinth, the other through part of the falling down western wall, south of the authentic entrance number 8.

See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p.82)

 

According to Della Corte, an electoral recommendation was found here at this doorway, reading –

Eutychi    [CIL IV 1369].

He hypothesised that Eutychi may have been the faithful servant/procurator, who stayed too long before fleeing from the eruption.

A skeleton was found in the lapilli, high up above the peristyle of VI.11.9/10, with a group of precious objects together with a key and seal registered to him and with the letters – Eutychi

See Della Corte, M., 1965.  Case ed Abitanti di Pompei. Napoli: Fausto Fiorentino. (p.44)

 

According to G. Luongo et al, the skeleton found above the peristyle was a woman.

See Luongo, G. et al. (2003): Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research126, (p.195)

 

According to Pagano and Prisciandaro, found in March 1835 in the middle of the peristyle but above the original soil level, was a skeleton.

Nearby were two gold circles, perhaps armbands or bracelets, (MN 24992 and 24993); three gold rings and an iron key, together with a bronze seal with an inscription –

Euti

chi     [CIL X 8058,33]

These objects are now in Naples Archaeological Museum, inventory numbers – MN 4755, 25830, 25831, 25832.

See Pagano, M. and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples : Nicola Longobardi.

(p.150) PAH, II, 304-5.

 

VI.11.8 Casa di Eutychus.  Looking across room 50 to room 49.  September 2005.

VI.11.8 Pompeii. September 2005. Looking across room 50 to room 49.  .

 

VI.11.8 Casa di Eutychus.  Looking in from entrance towards rooms 47 and 48.  September 2005.

VI.11.8 Pompeii. September 2005. Looking east from entrance towards rooms 47 and 48. 

 

VI.11.8 Casa di Eutychus.  Entrance from inside looking west.  December 2007.

VI.11.8 Pompeii. December 2007. Entrance doorway from inside, looking west. 

 

VI.11.8 Casa di Eutychus.  Room 48.  Looking towards entrance at VI.11.8.  September 2005.

VI.11.8 Pompeii. September 2005. Room 48, looking west towards entrance at VI.11.8. 

 

VI.11.8 Casa di Eutychus.  Room 45.  Impluvium?  December 2007.

VI.11.8 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 45, impluvium? 

 

VI.11.8 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 45, niche.  According to Boyce, in the north wall of the atrium were the ruins of a rectangular niche.
This was originally adorned with a stucco aedicula façade and decorated with painted ornaments. On the inside the ornaments were red leaves, and on the outside arabesques and a peacock. On the wall below the niche was a painting of two large serpents confronted at an altar imitating coloured marble. The altar was furnished with offerings on the top and above the serpents was a garland. See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14. (p.50, no.182)

VI.11.8 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 45, niche. 

According to Boyce, in the north wall of the atrium were the ruins of a rectangular niche.

This was originally adorned with a stucco aedicula façade and decorated with painted ornaments.

On the inside the ornaments were red leaves, and on the outside arabesques and a peacock.

On the wall below the niche was a painting of two large serpents confronted at an altar imitating coloured marble.

The altar was furnished with offerings on the top and above the serpents was a garland.

See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14. (p.50, no.182)

 

VI.11.8 Casa di Eutychus.  Looking across room 45 to rooms 47 and 48.  December 2007.

VI.11.8 Pompeii. December 2007. Looking across room 45 to rooms 47 and 48. 

 

VI.11.8 Casa di Eutychus.  Room 50.  Looking towards door to room 38 and rear of oven.  December 2007.

VI.11.8 Pompeii. December 2007.

Room 50, looking towards door to room 38 and rear of oven. 

 

VI.11.8 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 46, west wall.

VI.11.8 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 46, west wall. 

 

VI.11.8 Casa di Eutychus.  Rooms 47 and 48.  December 2007.

VI.11.8 Pompeii. December 2007. Rooms 47 and 48. 

 

VI.11.8 Casa di Eutychus.  Wall shared between rooms 45 and 47 looking east.  December 2007.

VI.11.8 Pompeii. December 2007.

Wall shared between rooms 45 and 47, looking east. 

 

VI.11.8 Casa di Eutychus.  Room 47.  December 2007.

VI.11.8 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 47

 

VI.11.8 Casa di Eutychus.  Room 48.  December 2007.

VI.11.8 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 48. 

 

VI.11.8 Casa di Eutychus.  Eastern corner of the south wall of room 49.  December 2007.

VI.11.8 Pompeii. December 2007.

Eastern corner of the south wall of room 49. 

 

VI.11.8 Casa di Eutychus.  Room 50.  Looking west.  December 2007.

VI.11.8 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 50, looking west. 

 

VI.11.8 Pompeii. July 2004. Room 50, latrine in north-west corner. Photo courtesy of Barry Hobson.

VI.11.8 Pompeii. July 2004. Room 50, latrine in north-west corner. Photo courtesy of Barry Hobson.

 

VI.11.8 Casa di Eutychus.  Room 51.  December 2007.

VI.11.8 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 51. 

 

VI.11.8 Casa di Eutychus.  Room 51.  December 2007.

VI.11.8 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 51. 

 

 

VI.11.8 / 9 / 10 Plan    (opens in separate window)