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V.I.13 Pompeii. Thermopolium/Caupona, Inn of Salvius. Excavated 1875.

 

According to Civale, -

“A large entrance hall opened onto the selling area, where there was a U-shaped brick counter with six dolia set into it, containing the food which was probably also displayed on shelves lining a wall.  Two other rooms for customers’ use were accessible from the shop area, decorated with 4th style paintings, and faced onto a courtyard at the end of which was the kitchen.  The owner’s quarters were on the upper floor. The body of a fugitive was found in the shop, surrounded by some coins and a remarkable amount of jewellery: 5 pairs of earrings, 11 gold rings, 3 silver rings, as well as a spoon and a small silver-disc with a head in bas-relief, numerous gemstones and two bronze signet rings/seals. The quantity, value and variety of the objects are inconsistent with the modest nature of the shop: it is probably that the Pompeian who died here at dawn on 25th August had remained too long in his flight to loot whatever he found on his way.

See British Museum catalogue: Tales from an eruption, Pompeii Herculaneum Oplontis, ed by P.G. Guzzo. (p.106-7 by Anna Civale).

 

V.6 Pompeii.September 2004.Vicolo delle Nozze d’Argento, looking east. Side wall of V.1.13

V.6 Pompeii, on left. September 2004. Vicolo delle Nozze d’Argento, looking east. Side wall of V.1.13, on right.

 

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2004. Entrance, looking east from Via Stabiana. For description, with plan, 
See - Packer, Jim: Inns at Pompeii: a short survey. In Cronache Pompeiane, IV, 1978, (p.39-43).

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2004. Entrance, looking east from Via Stabiana. For description, with plan,

See - Packer, Jim: Inns at Pompeii: a short survey. In Cronache Pompeiane, IV, 1978, (p.39-43).

 

V.I.13 Pompeii. 9th September 1875, in an excavation carried out in the presence of Prince Umberto,
many precious items were found here, including two bronze seals with the above wording.  
See Mau, BdI, 1877, p.136.
According to Eschebach, the seals read: C PRO PYLADES and MUSAE JUNI B
See Eschebach, L., 1993. Gebäudeverzeichnis und Stadtplan der antiken Stadt Pompeji. Köln: Böhlau. (p.124).
These bronze rings used for sealing documents are now held in Naples Archaeological Museum, inventory number 110828-29.
See British Museum catalogue: Tales from an eruption, Pompeii Herculaneum Oplontis, ed by P.G. Guzzo. (p.106-7).

V.I.13 Pompeii. 9th September 1875, in an excavation carried out in the presence of Prince Umberto,

many precious items were found here, including two bronze seals with the above wording. 

See Mau, Bullettino dell’Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica (DAIR), 1877, p.136.

According to Eschebach, the seals read: C PRO PYLADES and MUSAE JUNI B

See Eschebach, L., 1993. Gebäudeverzeichnis und Stadtplan der antiken Stadt Pompeji. Köln: Böhlau. (p.124).

These bronze rings used for sealing documents are now held in Naples Archaeological Museum, inventory number 110828-29.

See British Museum catalogue: Tales from an eruption, Pompeii Herculaneum Oplontis, ed by P.G. Guzzo. (p.106-7).

 

V.I.13 Pompeii. Seal of C PRO PYLADES. [CIL X 8058, 72]. On the ring handle is a winged caduceus.
See Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum Vol. X part 2, 1883. Berlin: Reimer, p. 919.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 110828.
According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de) this expands to
C(aius) Pro(culeius)
Pylades      [CIL X 8058, 72]

V.I.13 Pompeii. Seal of C PRO PYLADES. [CIL X 8058, 72]. On the ring handle is a winged caduceus.

See Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum Vol. X part 2, 1883. Berlin: Reimer, p. 919.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 110828.

According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de) this expands to

C(aius) Pro(culeius)

Pylades      [CIL X 8058, 72]

 

V.I.13 Pompeii. Seal of MUSAE JUNI B. [CIL X 8058, 55]. On the ring handle is a jug or vase.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 110829.
CIL X shows this as Musaei Iuni B(ruti?).
See Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum Vol. X part 2, 1883. Berlin: Reimer, p. 918.
According to the Epigraphic Database Roma it may also read 
Musaei Iuni B(laesi?)
See EDR CIL X 8058,55

V.I.13 Pompeii. Seal of MUSAE JUNI B. [CIL X 8058, 55]. On the ring handle is a jug or vase.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 110829.

CIL X shows this as Musaei Iuni B(ruti?).

See Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum Vol. X part 2, 1883. Berlin: Reimer, p. 918.

According to the Epigraphic Database Roma it may also read

Musaei Iuni B(laesi?)

See EDR CIL X 8058,55

 

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2006. Entrance, looking east. This area was hit by two bombs in 1943, and badly damaged and ruined. See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p.60)

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2006. Entrance, looking east.

This area was hit by two bombs in 1943, and badly damaged and ruined.

See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p.60).

 

V.I.13 Pompeii. July 2010. Looking north along pavement. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

V.I.13 Pompeii. July 2010. Looking north along pavement. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2006. Counter, looking north towards south side. According to Packer – 
“The U-shaped counter included 6 sunken dolia, it originally had a marble veneer, and a marble herm (a bearded Bacchus) was built into the south side.”
See - Packer, Jim: Inns at Pompeii: a short survey. In Cronache Pompeiane, IV, 1978, (p.40, and note 79).
Note 79: Owing to the partial destruction of the counter and its subsequent repair, its present appearance is entirely different.
A photograph of the counter’s appearance before it was incorrectly restored can be seen in the unpublished M.A. dissertation of S.M. Ruddell.
See Ruddell, S.M. The Inn, Restaurant and Tavern Business in Ancient Pompeii. Department of History, University of Maryland, 1964.
According to Mau, the small marble herm (0.52 high) of bearded Bacchus had traces of reddish colour in his hair. See Mau, BdI, 1877, p.135.

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2006. Counter, looking north towards south side. According to Packer –

“The U-shaped counter included 6 sunken dolia, it originally had a marble veneer, and a marble herm (a bearded Bacchus) was built into the south side.”

See - Packer, Jim: Inns at Pompeii: a short survey. In Cronache Pompeiane, IV, 1978, (p.40, and note 79).

Note 79: Owing to the partial destruction of the counter and its subsequent repair, its present appearance is entirely different.

A photograph of the counter’s appearance before it was incorrectly restored can be seen in the unpublished M.A. dissertation of S.M. Ruddell.

See Ruddell, S.M. The Inn, Restaurant and Tavern Business in Ancient Pompeii. Department of History, University of Maryland, 1964.

According to Mau, the small marble herm (0.52 high) of bearded Bacchus had traces of reddish colour in his hair.

See Mau, Bullettino dell’Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica (DAIR), 1877, p.135.

 

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2006. Looking east across counter with remains of 6 urns.

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2006. Looking east across counter with remains of 6 urns.

 

V.1.13 Pompeii. May 2003. Detail of three of the six remaining urns. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

V.1.13 Pompeii. May 2003. Detail of three of the six remaining urns. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

 

V.I.13Pompeii. December 2006. Counter, looking north.

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2006. Counter, looking north.

 

V.1.13 Pompeii. May 2003. Looking north-west at rear of counter. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.
According to Packer – 
Many small interesting finds were made in this room, including: two small bronze statuettes on bases, one of a Lar and one of Mercury, fragments of bronze candelabra, a badly preserved iron sword and two axes. The most interesting discoveries were, a human skeleton surrounded by money and jewellery: 5 pairs of gold earrings, 11 gold rings, 10 of which were set with semi-precious (?) stones, three silver rings, a small fragmentary silver shield with a head in low relief, 17 silver coins and a small silver spoon.
See Mau, in BdI, 1877, p.136.
Packer said that Della Corte had suggested that these objects represented loot collected by the man with whose skeleton they were found. Delaying his departure from Pompeii in order to plunder, he took refuge in the shop and was probably overcome by the fumes.
 See - Packer, Jim: Inns at Pompeii: a short survey. In Cronache Pompeiane, IV, 1978, (p.42-43)

V.1.13 Pompeii. May 2003. Looking north-west at rear of counter. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

According to Packer –

Many small interesting finds were made in this room, including: two small bronze statuettes on bases, one of a Lar and one of Mercury, fragments of bronze candelabra, a badly preserved iron sword and two axes. The most interesting discoveries were, a human skeleton surrounded by money and jewellery: 5 pairs of gold earrings, 11 gold rings, 10 of which were set with semi-precious (?) stones, three silver rings, a small fragmentary silver shield with a head in low relief, 17 silver coins and a small silver spoon.

See Mau, in Bullettino dell’Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica (DAIR), 1877, p.136.

Packer said that Della Corte had suggested that these objects represented loot collected by the man with whose skeleton they were found. Delaying his departure from Pompeii in order to plunder, he took refuge in the shop and was probably overcome by the fumes.

 See - Packer, Jim: Inns at Pompeii: a short survey. In Cronache Pompeiane, IV, 1978, (p.42-43)

 

V.1.13 Pompeii. May 2003. Looking towards north wall. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.
According to Packer – this room would have had a red dado (zoccolo) with white stucco above (seen on the north and east wall).
The room’s decorations described in BdI, 1877, p.135, as “simple and without interest”.

V.1.13 Pompeii. May 2003. Looking towards north wall. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

According to Packer – this room would have had a red dado (zoccolo) with white stucco above (seen on the north and east wall).

The room’s decorations described in Bullettino dell’Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica (DAIR), 1877, p.135, as “simple and without interest”.

 

V.I.13 Pompeii. May 2006. Niche or recess in north wall.

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2006. Niche or recess in north wall.

 

V.1.13 Pompeii. May 2003. Looking north-east from counter towards doorway to rear room and window overlooking front-room. 
The rear room had a recess for a couch extending for almost the entire length of the north wall. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

V.1.13 Pompeii. May 2003. Looking north-east from counter towards doorway to rear room and window overlooking front-room.

The rear room had a recess for a couch extending for almost the entire length of the north wall. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

 

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2006. Looking east through doorway into rear room of thermopolium.

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2006. Looking east through doorway into rear room of thermopolium. 

 

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2006.  Looking east along corridor to rear.

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2006. Looking east along corridor to rear.

 

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2004. Looking east towards rear.
According to Packer, - At the rear, on the north side of the corridor, would have been another room, probably used for dining.
This room originally had a marble threshold, and also a window in its north wall overlooking the Vicolo delle Nozze d’ Argento.
This room originally would have had decorations in the Fourth Style on a white background, with a still extant red dado (north wall).
To the east of that room would have been an open courtyard which had suffered from the 1943 bombing.
The stairs to the upper floor would have been against the north wall of the courtyard, running up towards its west end with a latrine beneath in the north-west corner.
In the north-east corner, in antiquity, would have been a second rear room, also lit by a window in the north wall, but its west and south walls were demolished to enlarge the courtyard.
The kitchen stands behind the courtyard with a large hearth in the north-west corner, and one (of the formerly two) masonry supports for a table in the south-east corner.
See - Packer, Jim: Inns at Pompeii: a short survey. In Cronache Pompeiane, IV, 1978, (p.40-42).

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2004. Looking east towards rear.

According to Packer, at the rear, on the north side of the corridor, would have been another room, probably used for dining.

This room originally had a marble threshold, and also a window in its north wall overlooking the Vicolo delle Nozze d’ Argento.

This room originally would have had decorations in the Fourth Style on a white background, with a still extant red dado (north wall).

To the east of that room would have been an open courtyard which had suffered from the 1943 bombing.

The stairs to the upper floor would have been against the north wall of the courtyard, running up towards its west end with a latrine beneath in the north-west corner.

In the north-east corner, in antiquity, would have been a second rear room, also lit by a window in the north wall, but its west and south walls were demolished to enlarge the courtyard.

The kitchen stands behind the courtyard with a large hearth in the north-west corner, and one (of the formerly two) masonry supports for a table in the south-east corner.

See - Packer, Jim: Inns at Pompeii: a short survey. In Cronache Pompeiane, IV, 1978, (p.40-42).

 

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2006.  Rear of Inn of Salvius.

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2006. Rear of Inn of Salvius.

 

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2006. South wall of corridor, with long recess (according to Mau, originally 3.07 long x 0.38 deep).
Above this recess the arched lararium niche was found (0.375 high, 0.335 wide), and at the rear of it was another recess or small niche which would probably have held a statuette.
See Mau, BdI, 1877, p.137.

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2006. South wall of corridor, with long recess (according to Mau, originally 3.07 long x 0.38 deep).

Above this recess the arched lararium niche was found (0.375 high, 0.335 wide), and at the rear of it was another recess or small niche which would probably have held a statuette.

See Mau, Bullettino dell’Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica (DAIR), 1877, p.137.

 

V.I.13 Pompeii.  South wall. According to Boyce, in the south wall of the corridor that led towards the rear was an arched niche.
In the rear wall of the niche there was a small vaulted recess, for a statuette.
See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14. (p.32, no.73)

V.I.13 Pompeii. December 2006. South wall.

According to Boyce, in the south wall of the corridor that led towards the rear was an arched niche.

In the rear wall of the niche there was a small vaulted recess, for a statuette.

See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14. (p.32, no.73)

 

V.1.13 Pompeii. May 2003. Niche in south wall, with small vaulted recess at rear for a statue. 
Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.
According to Boyce – 2 bronze statuettes were found in the room, one of a Lar (height 0.115), one of Mercury with winged petasos (height 0.112). 
He quoted references - Giorn. Scavi, N.S, iii, 1877, p.253, Bull. Inst, 1877 p.136, and VIOLA, Scavi, pp74, No.8, 75, No.18.
See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14. (p.32, no.73)

V.1.13 Pompeii. May 2003. Niche in south wall, with small vaulted recess at rear for a statue.

Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

According to Boyce – 2 bronze statuettes were found in the room, one of a Lar (height 0.115), one of Mercury with winged petasos (height 0.112).

He quoted references - Giorn. Scavi, N.S, iii, 1877, p.253, Bull. Inst, 1877 p.136, and VIOLA, Scavi, pp74, No.8, 75, No.18.

See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14. (p.32, no.73)

 

Outside north wall of V.I.13, Inn of Salvius in Vicolo delle Nozze d’ Argento. December 2006.

Outside north wall of V.I.13, Inn of Salvius in Vicolo delle Nozze d’ Argento, on right. December 2006.

 

The following pages are from Bullettino dell’Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica (DAIR), 1877, July, relating to V.1.13.

 

V.1.13 Pompeii. Bullettino dell’Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica (DAIR), 1877, July, p. 135.

V.1.13 Pompeii. Bullettino dell’Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica (DAIR), 1877, July, p. 135.

 

V.1.13 Pompeii. Bullettino dell’Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica (DAIR), 1877, July, p. 136.

V.1.13 Pompeii. Bullettino dell’Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica (DAIR), 1877, July, p. 136.

 

V.1.13 Pompeii. Bullettino dell’Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica (DAIR), 1877, July, p. 137.

V.1.13 Pompeii. Bullettino dell’Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica (DAIR), 1877, July, p. 137.

 

V.1.13 Pompeii. Bullettino dell’Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica (DAIR), 1877, July, p. 138.

V.1.13 Pompeii. Bullettino dell’Instituto di Corrispondenza Archeologica (DAIR), 1877, July, p. 138.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ultimo aggiornamento - Last updated: 06-Mar-2019 20:36