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I.10.2 Pompeii. Caupona di Coponia or Thermopolium of Prima or Caupona of Iris.

Linked to I.10.3. Excavated 1927 and 1934.

 

I.10.2 Pompeii. July 2012. Looking south-west along north side of insula, with doorways to I.10.2 and I.10.3 in the centre. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

I.10.2 Pompeii. July 2012.

Looking south-west along north side of insula, with doorways to I.10.2 and I.10.3 in the centre.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

I.10.2 Pompeii. December 2006. Entrance                                  and 1.10.3

I.10.2 Pompeii. December 2006. Entrance                                                              and 1.10.3

 

I.10.2 Pompeii. December 2006. Entrance, looking south.

I.10.2 Pompeii. December 2006. Entrance, looking south. 

 

I.10.2 Pompeii. December 2006. Remains of podium, originally with two dolia and a hearth.

I.10.2 Pompeii. December 2006. Remains of podium, originally with two dolia and a hearth.

 

I.10.2 Caupona Di Coponia or Thermopolium of Prima or Caupona of Iris.

I.10.2 Pompeii. December 2006.

East wall of caupona, with doorway in south-east corner to a rear room.

 

I.10.2 Pompeii. December 2006. West wall of caupona, and site of stairs to upper floor.  According to Della Corte, found to the right of the entrance in very small writing was a set of questions and answers between two rivals in love. Their names were Severus and Successus.  [CIL IV 8259-58] See Della Corte, M., 1965.  Case ed Abitanti di Pompei. Napoli: Fausto Fiorentino. (p.292)
According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de), these read as –
Successus textor amat coponiaes ancilla(m) 
nomine Hiredem quae quidem illum 
non curat sed illa com(m)iseretur 
scribit rivalis   vale 
invidiose quia rumper<i=E>s se<c=D>are noli formonsiorem 
/ 
et qui est homo prav<i=E>ssimus et bellus           [CIL IV 8259]
Dixi scripsi amas Hiredem 
quae te non curat SIX() Successo 
ut su[p]ra(t) [3]s[3] 
Severus                                                                           [CIL IV 8258]
According to Cooley, this the love story of Successus, Severus and Iris played out on the walls of the bar. [CIL IV 8258, 8259]
There are 3 messages, the first and third by Severus, the second is the reply of Successus.  These translate as -
(Severus)  -  “Successus, a  weaver, loves the innkeeper’s slave girl named Iris, She, however, does not love him.  Still he begs her to have pity on him. His rival wrote this.  Goodbye” 
(Answer by Successus)  - “Envious one, why do you get in the way. 
 Submit to a handsomer man and one who is being treated very wrongly and good looking” 
(Answer by Severus) -  “I have spoken. I have written all there is to say. You love Iris, but she does not love you”.
See Cooley, A. and M.G.L., 2004. Pompeii : A Sourcebook. London : Routledge. (p.77-78)

I.10.2 Pompeii. December 2006. West wall of caupona, and site of stairs to upper floor. 

According to Della Corte, found to the right of the entrance in very small writing was a set of questions and answers between two rivals in love.

Their names were Severus and Successus.  [CIL IV 8259-58]

See Della Corte, M., 1965.  Case ed Abitanti di Pompei. Napoli: Fausto Fiorentino. (p.292)

 

According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de), these read as –

 

Successus textor amat coponiaes ancilla(m)

nomine Hiredem quae quidem illum

non curat sed illa com(m)iseretur

scribit rivalis   vale

 

invidiose quia rumper<i=E>s se<c=D>are noli formonsiorem

/

et qui est homo prav<i=E>ssimus et bellus           [CIL IV 8259]

Dixi scripsi amas Hiredem

quae te non curat SIX() Successo

ut su[p]ra(t) [3]s[3]

Severus                                                                           [CIL IV 8258]

 

According to Cooley, this the love story of Successus, Severus and Iris played out on the walls of the bar. [CIL IV 8258, 8259]

There are 3 messages, the first and third by Severus, the second is the reply of Successus.

These translate as -

(Severus)  -  “Successus, a  weaver, loves the innkeeper’s slave girl named Iris, She, however, does not love him.

                         Still he begs her to have pity on him. His rival wrote this.  Goodbye”

(Answer by Successus)  - “Envious one, why do you get in the way.

                                                  Submit to a handsomer man and one who is being treated very wrongly and good looking”

(Answer by Severus) -  “I have spoken. I have written all there is to say.

                                            You love Iris, but she does not love you”.

See Cooley, A. and M.G.L., 2004. Pompeii : A Sourcebook. London : Routledge. (p.77-78)